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Page Title: The Affective Domain
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Comprehension - 134t_74
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Navy Instructor Manual - Military manual for teaching in the military
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Perception
make  sure  they  reflect  an  accurate  indication  of  the  desired  learning  outcomes  and,  in  fact, measure  what  you  think  they  are  measuring.  You  cannot  measure  level  three  outcomes  by  level one   objectives.   Nor   can   you   measure   student   comprehension   by   asking   “recall”   level   questions. The   responsibility   for   ensuring   learning   outcomes   falls   largely   to   you,   the   instructor.   If   the intended  outcome  of  instruction  is  for  the  student  to  be  able  to  “apply”  theory,  principles,  or concepts  (level  three  of  the  cognitive  domain),  then  objectives  must  developed  and  taught  at  that level. Domains  involve  a  “hierarchy”  of  learning  outcomes.  Those  outcomes  allow  you  to  provide instruction  in  a  defined  sequence. Thus,   you   present   facts,   methods,   basic   procedures,   and terminology.  Then  you  can  measure  your  students’  accomplishment  of  those  objectives  (by testing)  before  teaching  higher  levels  of  information. The  objectives  show  students  what  they  are  expected  to  learn  from  instruction.  The  objectives tell  the  instructor  at  what  “level”  to  present  information.    If  the  purpose  of  a  topic,  as  defined by  the  learning  objectives,  is  to  cover  information  at  the  knowledge  level,  be  careful  not  to  go into   too   much   detail.   Conversely,   if   the   purpose   is   to   teach   students   to   apply   the   information presented,   don’t   make   the   critical   error   of   presenting   information   only   at   the   knowledge   level. THE   AFFECTIVE   DOMAIN The   affective   domain   defines   learning   outcomes   associated   with   emotions   and   feelings,   such as  interest,  attitudes,  and  appreciation. Measuring   the   accomplishment   of   objectives   in   the affective  domain  is  generally  more  difficult  than  in  the  other  domains.  In  this  domain  we  are  not only  interested  in  a  “correct  response”  but  also  in  determining  the  student’s  feeling,  attitude,  and interest   toward   the   subject. THE   PSYCHOMOTOR   DOMAIN In  Navy  training  a  large  percentage  of  course  objectives  are  associated  with  the  cognitive domain  while  a  relatively  small  percentage  are  associated  with  the  affective  domain.  Because of   the   nature   of   technical   training,   the   Navy   places   a   great   deal   of   emphasis   on   learning outcomes  of  the  psychomotor  domain. In   the   chapter   on   “Principles   of   Learning,”   you   read   about   the   ways   people   learn.   They included   imitation,   trial   and   error,   transfer,   association,   and   insight.   While   none   of   these   ways are  unique  to  any  one  domain,  imitation,  trial  and  error,  and  transfer  are  closely  associated  with the   psychomotor   domain. Students  accomplish  much  of  their  skill  learning  by  imitating  behaviors  they  observe  in  others. They  acquire  some  skills  by  trying  something  until  they  hit  upon  a  satisfactory  (though  not necessarily   correct)   solution   or   outcome. Transfer,   you   remember,   is   applying   past   learning   in   new   ways.   You   cannot   always   provide students  with  skill  training  on  actual  equipments. Thus,  you  must  strive  to  create  realistic learning   situations   that   will   enable   students   to   “transfer”   that   learning   to   their   actual   job. The  categories  of  the  psychomotor  domain  are  as  follows: 65

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