Quantcast Individual Differences - 134t_38

Click Here to
Order this information in Print

Click Here to
Order this information on CD-ROM

Click Here to
Download this information in PDF Format

 

Click here to make tpub.com your Home Page

Page Title: Individual Differences
Back | Up | Next

Click here for a printable version

Google


Web
www.tpub.com

Home

   
Information Categories
.... Administration
Advancement
Aerographer
Automotive
Aviation
Combat
Construction
Diving
Draftsman
Engineering
Electronics
Food and Cooking
Math
Medical
Music
Nuclear Fundamentals
Photography
Religion
USMC
   
Products
  Educational CD-ROM's
Printed Manuals
Downloadable Books

   


 

Share on Google+Share on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on TwitterShare on DiggShare on Stumble Upon
Back
Common Characteristics of Students -Continued
Up
Navy Instructor Manual - Military manual for teaching in the military
Next
Learning Styles - 134t_39
Students   commonly   enter   the   training   arena   without   actually   meeting   established   prerequisites. Learn  your  students’  physical  capabilities  so  that  you  can  prevent  them  from  injuring  themselves or  other  students.  More  subtle  differences  exist  in  aptitude  and  ability.  Aptitude  depends  on the   student’s   intelligence,   inquisitiveness,   ambition,   reasoning   ability,   and   other   mental   traits. Ability  is  somewhat  similar  to  aptitude  but  deals  more  with  skills  in  processing  information  to acquire  concepts  or  to  master  physical  skills. Training  is  aimed  at  the  center  of  our  target  population,  the  average  learner.  Since  your  job is  to  keep  courses  geared  to  the  average  learner,  you  must  know  as  much  about  the  individuals in   the   class   as   possible.   Slow   learners   require   your   patience   and   understanding,   often   forcing you   to   devote   extra   effort   toward   tutoring,   diagnosing   specific   difficulties,   or   motivating   them toward   success.   Fast   learners   can   become   classroom   assets   if   you   appeal   to   their   superior knowledge  and  leadership  qualities.  They  can  just  as  easily  turn  into  liabilities  if  cast  adrift  in a  sea  of  boredom  while  waiting  for  their  peers  to  catch  up. Emotional  differences  also  play  a  major  role  in  training.  Almost  every  class  will  have students   with   personalities   ranging   from   introverted   to   extroverted.   Neither   is   “bad.”   Most   will be  somewhere  around  the  middle  of  the  spectrum.  Those  at  the  extremes,  however,  will  require understanding   and   special   attention. The   extrovert   is   sociable   and   outspoken,   usually demonstrating   outgoing   behavior.   You   may   have   some   concern   of   losing   control   of   the   class because   of   the   extrovert’s   “take   charge”   nature.    Learn  to  recognize  and  control  the  behavior without  squelching  the  desirable  trait  of  wanting  to  take  an  active  part.  The  introvert,  on  the other  hand,  will  be  shy  and  nonaggressive. Do  not  confuse  that  with  a  lack  of  aptitude  or ability.   Draw   these   students   into   class   activities   by   using   whatever   motivational   tools   you   can muster  without  giving  the  appearance  of  badgering. Students’  experiences  and  backgrounds  also  play  major  roles  in  the  makeup  of  most  classes. Most   classes   will   be   made   up   of   students   with   widely   varying   backgrounds.   As   an   instructor, you  should  be  aware  of  some  research  recently  completed  by  the  American  Association  of University  Women  (AAUW).  In  The   AAUW   Report:   How   Schools   Shortchange   Girls,   t he research  discovered  gender  bias  was  still  prevalent  within  our  school  systems  from  the  pre-school through   college   level.   Females   are   simply   not   encouraged   to   participate   in   classrooms,   and   in fact,  are  admonished  for  behavior  such  as  speaking  out  or  answering  incorrectly.  Their  male counterparts,  however,  are  rewarded  for  vocal  behavior  in  the  classroom  through  gaining  of  the teacher’s  attention  and  dismissal  of  inappropriate  behaviors  with  the  old  axiom  of  “boys  will  be boys.”   Research   has   shown   that   when   a   male   answers   a   question   incorrectly,   the   teacher   will coach  them  to  the  right  answer.  When  a  female  provides  an  incorrect  answer,  the  teacher  will give  her  the  right  answer.  Thus,  a  female  never  develops  reasoning  skills  or  becomes  interested in  reaching  beyond  a  right/wrong  response. Gender   bias   has   many   implications   for   those   teaching   technology-related   courses.   While   the gender  gap  in  mathematics  achievement  is  small  and  declining,  the  gender  gap  in  science  areas has   increased.   Boys   are   not   innately   superior   to   girls   in   quantitative   skills.   girls’   math   grades are  as  high  or  higher  than  boys,  but  boys  are  likely  to  outperform  girls  on  standardized  math tests.  Math  confidence  has  a  stronger  link  to  math  achievement  than  any  other  variable.  As girls  grow  up,  they  lose  confidence  in  their  ability  to  do  well  in  math.  Studies  have  shown  that girls’  loss  of  confidence  in  their  math  abilities  precedes  a  decline  in  achievement.  Girls  who  do well   in   math   tend   to   have   nontraditional   views   of   gender   roles. 28

Privacy Statement - Press Release - Copyright Information. - Contact Us - Support Integrated Publishing

Integrated Publishing, Inc.