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Glossary: E - F
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Glossary: L - M
FREEBOARD -The  vertical  distance  from  the  weather deck  to  the  waterline. GAFF-A small spar on the after mast from which the national  ensign  is  flown  while  underway. GENERAL  QUARTERS-The condition of maximum readiness for combat with the crew at battle stations. GIG-A   ship's   boat   designated   for   use   by   the commanding   officer. GRAPNEL -A small four-armed anchor used to recover objects in the water. GRIPE-Device for securing a boat at its davits or in a cradle. GROUND TACKLE-The collective term identifying the equipment used in anchoring or mooring with anchors. HALYARD -A line used to hoist a flag or pennant. HATCH-An access opening in the deck of a ship, fitted with a hatch cover for watertight closure. HAWSEPIPE-A large pipe through which the anchor cable runs from the deck out through the side. HAWSER-A heavy line over 5 inches in circumference used for towing or mooring. HEADWAY-The  forward  movement  of  a  vessel through  the  water. HEAVE-(1) To throw, as to “HEAVE THE LEAD” or to “HEAVE A LINE.”   (2) To haul in a line. HEAVE  AROUND-(1) The act of hauling in a line or chain by means of a capstan. HEAVE  TO-The act of stopping a vessel from making headway. HEAVING  LINK-A light weighted line thrown across to a ship or pier when coming alongside to act as a messenger for a mooring line. The weight is called a “monkey fist.” HELMSMAN-The person who steers a ship or boat. HIGHLINE -A   line   rigged   between   two   ships underway transferring personnel or light stores. HITCH-(1) A knot whose loops come together in use, particularly  under  strain,  yet  is  easily  separated when strain is removed. (2) A method of securing a line to a hook, ring, or spar. (3) Slang for a term of enlistment. HOIST OUT-To swing out and lower away a boat. HOLD-The compartment aboard ship used for stowing cargo. HOLIDAY -Any  unscrubbed  or  unpainted  section  of  a deck  or  bulkhead.  Any  space  left  unfinished inadvertently  or  through  carelessness. IRISH PENNANT-A loose, untidy end of a line left adrift. JACK-The blue, white-starred flag flown at the bow (jackstaff) of a vessel at anchor or moored. JACKBOX-A   receptacle,   usually   secured   to   a bulkhead, into which are fitted telephone plugs or jacks. JACK-OF-THE-DUST-The person in charge of the provision  issue  room. JACOB'S  LADDER-A portable ladder with ropes and wooden rungs, slung over the side for temporary use. JETTISON -Throw over the side when emergency reduction  of  weight  is  required. JEW'S  HARP-A ring or shackle at the upper end of a shank of an anchor to which the anchor chain is secured. JURY  RIG-Temporary  or  makeshift  device,  rig,  or piece  of  equipment. KAPOK-A natural, light, waterproof fiber used in stuffing  life  jackets. KEEL-The lowermost central strength member of a ship which runs fore and aft, and from which rise the  frames  and  plating. KING POSTS-Vertical posts supporting cargo booms of cargo ships. KINK-A twist that disturbs the lay of line or wire. KNIFE  EDGE-The rim of a door frame, hatch, or post that meets the gasket for a watertight fit. KNOT-(1) A unit of speed equal to 1 nautical mile (6,080 feet) per hour. (2) A collective term for hitches  and  bends. LAGGING-The insulation surrounding pipes aboard ship. LANYARD -A strong line made fast to an object to secure it, or to trigger a firing mechanism such as a firing  lanyard. LASH-To secure by line or wire by wrapping and tying or by chain. AI-6

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