Quantcast Mooring a Ship with Lines

Click Here to
Order this information in Print

Click Here to
Order this information on CD-ROM

Click Here to
Download this information in PDF Format

 

Click here to make tpub.com your Home Page

Page Title: Mooring a Ship with Lines
Back | Up | Next

Click here for a printable version

Google


Web
www.tpub.com

Home

   
Information Categories
.... Administration
Advancement
Aerographer
Automotive
Aviation
Combat
Construction
Diving
Draftsman
Engineering
Electronics
Food and Cooking
Math
Medical
Music
Nuclear Fundamentals
Photography
Religion
USMC
   
Products
  Educational CD-ROM's
Printed Manuals
Downloadable Books

   


 

Share on Google+Share on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on TwitterShare on DiggShare on Stumble Upon
Back
Reeving Gantlines
Up
Seaman - Military manual for the Seaman rate
Next
Mooring Lines
Figure 4-33.–Rigging with a stage hitch. leadlines are so fixed that the depth may be read at the level of the chains instead of at the water's edge. This procedure makes it easier to take sounds at night. Learn any special markings of the leadline that may be used on your ship. Report each sounding to the bridge in a sharp, clear voice. When the sounding agrees with one of the marks, report it by mark as 2, 3, 5. Figure 4-34.–Markings of lead line. When it falls on an even fathom between marks, report it as by the deep 4, 5, 8 or 9. If the reading does not give an even fathom, it is reported, for example, as “A QUARTER LESS THREE”, “AND A QUARTER, FOUR”, “AND A HALF, FOUR.” Respectively, these reports mean that there are 1/4 fathom less than 3 fathoms of water, 1/4 fathom more than 4, and 1/2 fathom more than 4. If the bottom is not reached, report “NO BOTTOM AT (number of fathoms).” MOORING A SHIP WITH LINES LEARNING   OBJECTIVES:   Describe   the line-handling  procedures  to  moor  a  ship. Recognize  the  difference  between  standing  and running  rigging. The lines used to secure the ship to a wharf, pier, or another  ship  are  called  mooring  lines.  Five-inch synthetic rope is used for mooring lines in destroyers or smaller vessels. Larger ships may use 8-inch or even 10-inch lines. Nylon, polyester, and aramid fiber lines are now common for all types of ships. Aramid fiber rope is lighter and smaller (9 inch circumference nylon reduced to 5 7/8 circumference aramid) for equivalent breaking strength to other synthetic ropes. See fig- ure 4-35. Each mooring line should be faked out on deck near the chock through which it will pass with each eye passed  through  the  chock  and  looped  back  over  the lifeline, for passing to the pier. The mooring line that runs through the bullnose or chock near the stem of the ship is called the bow line. The line farthest aft at the stern line is called the stern line. These lines lead up and down the dock respectfully to reduce the fore-and-aft motion of the ship. Other 4-41

Privacy Statement - Press Release - Copyright Information. - Contact Us - Support Integrated Publishing

Integrated Publishing, Inc.