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Replenisment Operations Signals
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In this case, the combatants must furnish and tend the highline. Each replenishment station has a telephone line to the corresponding station on the other ship. Necessary commands  are  transmitted  by  telephone,  and  a Signalman also gives them by the hand or by light signals as shown in figure 4-24. It is a good idea to post these hand signals at the replenishment stations or, better yet, to stencil them on the backs of the paddles. PHONE/DISTANCE   LINE The zero end of the distance line (fig. 4-25) is secured at or near the rail of the delivering ship, and the other  end  is  hand-tended  on  the  receiving  ship. Embedded in the polypropylene distance line are the conductors  for  the  sound-powered  (S/P)  telephone  line, which provides the communication link between the bridges of the two ships. A  bridge-to-bridge  (B/B)  combination  phone/ distance line and station-to-station line are normally provided by the receiving ship. The line is fitted with a double jackbox at each end labeled B/B PHONE. Mark- ers attached to the line indicate the distance between ships, enabling conning officers to know immediately when the ship is opening or closing distance. Daylight markers (marker flags) consist of 8-inch by 10-inch numbered  colored  cloth,  nylon-coated  fabric,  or  painted canvas squares spaced 20 feet apart. At night, a red flashlight or red chemical light is fastened at the leading edge of each daytime marker with the exception of the blue lights indicated in figure 4-25. The zero end of the line is secured to the rail of the delivery ship at a right angle to the ship's centering in view of the conning officer.  During  night  replenishment,  the  line  tender keeps  the  conning  officer  informed  on  the  distance. Electric megaphones are used during the approach until  telephones  are  connected.  After  the  telephones  are connected, the megaphones are the main standby method  of  communicating. SOUND-POWERED TELEPHONES Sound-powered  telephones  are  the  principle  means of  passing  information  Although  the  receiving  ship Figure 4-25.–Bridge-to-bridge phone/distance line markings. 4-30

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