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Close-In Method
A  complete  set  of  working  tools  and  repair equipment  must  be  maintained  in  a  location  that  can  be readily accessed by transfer station personnel.   Tools and equipment should be inventoried and checked for proper operation before each replenishment.   Each transfer  station  should  maintain,  as  a  part  of  station equipment, a listing of all items (tools, spares, and so forth) that may be required to repair the station, together with the stowage location of such items. REPLENISHMENT RIGS LEARNING   OBJECTIVE:   Identify   the common replenishment at sea and fueling at sea rigs. Replenishment at sea is conducted by using a span wire to support the fuel hose rig between the two ships. The  span-wire  rig  or  close-in  method  may  be  used.  The method  used  is  determined  by  the  type  of  ship delivering the fuel and the conditions under which the delivery  must  be  made.  The  main  difference  between the rigs is in the method of extending the hose to the receiving ship. Of the two, the span wire is preferred. Ships not equipped to transfer by span wire must do so by the close-in method. SPAN-WIRE   METHOD In the span-wire method of fueling at sea, the hose is carried between ships on a span wire that may be tensioned or untensioned. The untensioned span wire, normally is referred to as the conventional span-wire rig. The tensioned span-wire method is referred to as STREAM. STREAM rigs are rigged with four saddles and a hose length of approximately 300 feet. The hose hangs from trolley blocks that ride along the span wire. Saddle whips position the hose while fueling, and serve to  retrieve  the  hose  after  the  fueling  operation  is completed. The span-wire rig (see fig. 4-27) permits ships to open  out  from  140  to  180  feet.  Such  distance  is reasonably safe and makes it fairly easy to maneuver Figure 4-27.–Fuel stream, single hose with probe. 4-32

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