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Hazard Prevention
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Naval Safety Supervisor - Military manual on safety practices
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Figure 3-2.-Navy Employee Report of Unsafe or Unhealthful Working Condition
Figure  3-1.—Local  exhaust  ventilation. Administrative  Control Administrative  control  emoploys  special  operating procedures to reduce the exposure of personnel to hazards. Examples include procedures that limit access to high hazard areas and that provide for adjusted work schedules  such  as  heat  stress  safe  stay  times.  Another example is an operating procedure requiring the use of semiautomatic  equipment  that  does  not  require  constant attendance  (time  separation).  Adjusted  work  schedules should be used only when personnel maybe repeatedly exposed  to  the  hazard  without  adverse  effect. Personal Protective Equipment The use of personal protective equipment (PPE) is the least preferred method of hazard control. With this method,  any  equipment  breakdown,  failure,  or  misuse immediately exposes the wearer to the hazard. The effectiveness of the PPE also depends on the conscious effort of the user to wear it properly. Nevertheless, when other methods cannot achieve adequate risk reduction, personal  protective  devices  must  be  used,  either  alone or in conjunction with other protective measures. HAZARD  IDENTIFICATION Hazard  identification  occurs  through  observation and  routine  safety  program  evaluations,  surveys,  and formal inspections. The safety officer, safety manager, safety petty officer, or safety supervisor trains people to recognize hazards. In chapters 6, 7, and 8, we discuss the  program  evaluation  and  hazard  identification process for shore, afloat, and aviation activities. HAZARD  REPORTING The  earliest  possible  detection  of  unsafe  or unhealthful working conditions and the prompt control of hazards identified as a result of those conditions are essential.  Encourage  your  subordinates  to  submit promptly  a  report  of  unsafe  or  unhealthful  conditions. All   personnel   should   orally   report   unsafe   or unhealthful  working  conditions  to  their  immediate supervisor.  That  supervisor  should  promptly  evaluate the  situation  and  take  appropriate  corrective  actions. Supervisors  will  contact  the  Occupational  Safety  and Health (OSH) office, safety manager, division safety petty  officer,  division  officer,  or  safety  officer  for assistance, if needed. The person reporting the hazard must be kept informed of all actions taken. After   personnel   orally   report   an   unsafe   or unhealthful  condition,  they  may  expect  the  supervisor to  investigate  the  situation.  If  their  supervisor  takes  no action to investigate the condition or they are unsatisfied with the result, personnel may submit a written report. Ashore,  the  poster,   DD   Form   2272,   DOD Occupational  Safety  and  Health  Protection  Program, reminds  employees  that  hazard  reporting  is  their 3-7

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