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Appendix I Glossary - 14220_401
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Quartermaster 1 & C - Military manual for the Quartermaster rate
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Appendix I, Continued - 14220_403
Appendix I, Continued BINNACLE.—The  stand  in  which  a compass  is  mounted. BLAST.—Signal  on  a  ship’s  whistle;  short, about  1  second;  prolonged,  4  to  6  seconds. BLINKING.—Regular  shifting  right  and left of a loran signal to indicate that the signals  are  out  of  synchronization. BROAD   COMMAND PENNANT.—Personal  command  pennant of  an  officer,  not  a  flag  officer. BUOY.—A  floating  object,  other  than  a lightship,  moored  or  anchored  to  the bottom as an aid to navigation. CELESTIAL   EQUATOR.—The intersection  of  the  celestial  sphere  and extended plane of the equator. CELESTIAL   NAVIGATION.—Navigation with the aid of celestial bodies. CELESTIAL  SPHERE.—An  imaginary sphere  of  infinite  radius  concentric  with Earth  on  which  all  celestial  bodies  except Earth are imagined to be provided. CELSIUS.—Temperature  based  upon  a scale  in  which,  under  standard  atmospheric pressure,  water  freezes  at  0°  and  boils  at 100°. CHART.—A  map  intended  primarily  for navigational use. CHRONOMETER.—A  timepiece  with  a nearly constant rate. CIRROCUMULUS—High   clouds   (mean lower  level  above  20,000  feet),  composed of  small  white  flakes  or  of  very  small globular masses. CIRROSTRATUS.—Thin,  whitish,  high clouds  (mean  lower  level  above  20,000 feet). CIRRUS.—Detached  high  clouds  (mean lower  level  above  20,000  feet)  of  delicate and fibrous appearance. CLOSE  ABOARD.—Near;  within  600 yards  for  ship,  400  yards  for  boat. CLOSEST  POINT  OF  APPROACH.—The position  of  a  contact  when  it  reaches  its minimum  range  to  own  ship. CLOSE  UP.-A  flag  that  is  all  the  way  up on its halyard. CLOUD.—A  visible  assemblage  of numerous  tiny  droplets  of  water  or  ice crystals  formed  by  condensation  of  water vapor in the air with the base above the surface of Earth. COAST  PILOT.—A  descriptive  book  for the  use  of  mariners,  containing  detailed information  about  coastal  waters,  harbor facilities, and so forth, of an area, particularly  along  the  coasts  of  the  United States. COLORS.—The  national  flag.  The ceremony of raising the flag at 0800 and lowering it at sunset aboard a ship not under way or at a shore station. AI-2

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