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Planning and Constructing Restricted Water Tracks, continued - 14220_383
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Planning and Constructing Restricted Water Tracks, Continued - 14220_385
Planning and Constructing Restricted Water Tracks, Continued Danger  Bearings A  danger  bearing  is  used  by  the  navigator  to  keep  the  ship  clear  of  an outlying  area  of  danger  close  to  where  the  ship  must  pass.  In  all probability,  a  danger  area  has  been  previously  surveyed  and  is  plotted  on the  chart,  but,  in  the  vast  majority  of  cases,  it  will  give  no  warning  of  its presence  to  the  eye.  Examples  of  such  dangers  are  submerged  rocks, reefs,  wrecks,  and  shoals.  A  danger  bearing  must  be  established between  two  fixed  objects,  one  of  which  is  the  danger  area.  The  other object  must  be  selected  to  satisfy  the  following  conditions:  (1)  It  must be  visible  to  the  eye;  (2)  it  must  be  indicated  on  the  chart;  and  (3)  true bearing  from  the  danger  area  should  be  in  the  same  general  direction  as the  course  of  the  ship  as  it  proceeds  past  the  danger. Figure  12-6.  Example  of  a  danger  bearing. As  shown  in  figure  12-6,  a  ship  is  proceeding  along  a  coast  on  an intended  track  of  090°T  at  a  speed  of  5  knots  (line  AB).  A  shoal  on  the port  side  is  to  be  avoided.  A  line  is  drawn  from  lighthouse  H,  tangent to  the  outer  edge  of  the  danger  (line  HX).  As  long  as  the  bearing  of lighthouse  H  is  less  than  line  XH  (the  danger  bearing),  the  ship  is  in safe  water.  The  danger  bearing  in  this  illustration  is  074°T.  You  will notice  that  the  danger  side  of  the  danger  bearing  is  hatched.  The  danger bearing  is  also  labeled  with  NMT  (meaning  NOT  MORE  THAN).  An example  of  a  bearing  to  lighthouse  H  that  would  indicate  that  the  ship  is in  safe  water  is  the  broken  line  YH.  No  part  of  this  bearing  line  passes through  the  danger  area. Any  bearing  greater  than  the  danger  bearing (line  XH),  such  as  the  broken  line  ZH,  indicates  a  possible  dangerous situation.  If  the  danger  area  is  being  passed  on  the  port  side,  as  in  this illustration,  the  safe  bearing  is  less  than  the  danger  bearing.  Danger angles  are  not  normally  used;  however,  you  should  use  Pub  9,  Bowditch, to  learn  more  about  using  them. 12-10

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