Quantcast Plotting Techniques - 14220_219

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Plotting  lstruments,  Continued - 14220_218
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Plotting Techniques, Continued - 14220_220
Plotting Techniques General Procedure To  travel  accurately  and  safely  from  point  to  point  on  Earth’s  surface, charts  have  been  constructed  to  show  the  locations  of  most  all  prominent places.  Using  these  charts,  a  navigator  can  plan  the  voyages.  By drawing  a  line  on  the  chart  from  one  place  to  another,  a  navigator establishes  a  line  known  as  a  course  line,  the  purpose  of  which  is  simply to  provide  a  graphic  representation  of  a  vessel’s  course.  Careful attention  must  be  paid  to  ensure  that  there  are  no  dangers  to  navigation, such  as  rocks,  reefs,  islands,  and  so  forth,  along  the  route  of  intended travel.  From  this  line,  the  navigator  determines  the  direction  in  which the  ship  must  sail  to  arrive  at  the  desired  location.  By  measuring  the distance  between  the  two  places  and  knowing  the  speed  of  the  ship,  the navigator  computes  how  long  the  voyage  will  take. As  defined  in  the  terms  table,  course  (C)  is  horizontal  direction  of  travel, expressed  as  angular  distance  from  a  reference  direction,  usually  from 000°  clockwise  through  360°.  For  marine  navigation,  the  term  course applies  to  the  direction  to  be  steered,  which  sometimes  differs  from  the direction  you  intend  to  make  good  over  the  ground.  Course  is  most often  designated  as  true,  but  may  also  be  designated  as  magnetic, compass,  or  gyro. Often  while  the  ship  is  following  the  intended  track,  it  will  be  necessary to  change  course  to  avoid  other  ships  or  make  adjustments  for  current that  sets  the  ship  off  the  intended  track. Maintaining  the  DR  plot  is  a  matter  of  closely  following  the  six  rules  of DR.  Let’s  look  at  an  example  of  what  is  required  to  maintain  a  sample plot.  The  example  shown  in  figure  8-9  illustrates  a  typical  DR  plot.  At 0900  your  ship  departs  point  A  en  route  to  point  B  on  course  065°T, speed  10  knots.  In  this  particular  example,  DRs  are  laid  out  every  30 minutes;  you  expect  to  arrive  at  point  B  at  1200.  At  0941  you  change course  to  avoid  shipping  traffic.  At  1000  you  obtain  a  fix  which  places your  ship  right  of  your  track  line.  Based  on  the  1000  fix,  you recommend  course  075°T  to  arrive  at  point  B  on  time. 8-15

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