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Figure 12-7. Example restricted water track
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Precision  Anchoring,  Continued - 14220_388
Precision  Anchoring Selecting an Anchorage An  anchorage  position  in  most  cases  is  specified  by  higher  authority. Anchorages  for  most  ports  are  assigned  by  the  local  port  authority  in response  to  individual  or  joint  requests  for  docking  or  visit.  Naval  ships submit  a  port  visit  (PVST)  request  letter  or  logistic  requirement (LOGREQ)  message  well  in  advance  of  the  ship’s  scheduled  arrival date.  Operational  anchorages  in  areas  outside  the  jurisdiction  of  an established  port  authority  are  normally  assigned  by  the  senior  officer present  afloat  (SOPA)  for  ships  under  his  or  her  command. If  a  ship  is  steaming  independently  and  is  required  to  anchor  in  other than  an  established  port,  the  selection  of  an  anchorage  is  usually  made by  the  navigator  and  then  approved  by  the  commanding  officer.  In  all cases,  however,  regardless  of  whether  the  anchorage  is  selected  by higher  authority  or  by  the  navigator,  the  following  conditions  should always  apply  insofar  as  possible: The  anchorage  should  be  at  a  position  sheltered  from  the  effects  of strong  winds  and  current. The  bottom  should  be  good  holding  ground,  such  as  mud  or  sand rather  than  rocks  or  reefs. The  water  depth  should  be  neither  too  shallow,  hazarding  the  ship, nor  too  deep,  facilitating  the  dragging  of  the  anchor. The  position  should  be  free  from  such  hazards  to  the  anchor  cable  as fish  traps,  buoys,  and  submarine  cables. The  position  should  be  free  from  such  hazards  as  shoals  and sandbars. There  should  be  a  suitable  number  of  landmarks,  daymarks,  and lighted  NAVAIDs  available  for  fixing  the  ship’s  position  both  by day  and  by  night. If  boat  runs  to  shore  are  to  be  made,  the  anchorage  chosen  should  be in  close  proximity  to  the  intended  landing. 12-13

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