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Precision Anchoring, Continued - 14220_391
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Precision Anchoring, Continued - 14220_393
Precision  Anchoring,  Continued Executing the Anchorage When  executing  the  actual  anchorage,  the  navigator’s  dual  objective  is  to keep  the  ship  as  near  as  possible  on  its  preplanned  approach  track  and  to have  all  headway  off  the  ship  when  the  hawsepipe  is  directly  over  the center  of  the  anchorage.  As  mentioned  above,  the  navigator  obtains frequent  fixes  as  the  ship  proceeds  along  its  track,  and  keeps  the  bridge continually  informed  as  to  the  position  of  the  ship  in  relation  to  the  track and  the  letting-go  circle.  The  navigator  recommends  courses  to  get  back onto  track  if  necessary.  Since  every  ship  has  its  own  handling characteristics,  speeds  that  should  be  ordered  as  the  ship  proceeds  along the  track  are  difficult  to  specify.  In  general,  however,  with  1,000  yards to  go,  most  ships  usually  slow  to  a  speed  of  5  to  7  knots.  Depending  on wind  and  current,  engines  should  be  stopped  when  about  300  yards  from the  letting-go  circle,  and  the  anchor  detail  should  be  instructed  to  "stand by."  As  the  vessel  draws  near  the  drop  circle,  engines  are  normally reversed  so  as  to  have  all  remaining  headway  off  the  ship  as  it  passes over  the  letting-go  circle.  When  the  pelorus  is  exactly  at  the  letting-go bearing,  the  word  "Let  go  the  anchor"  is  passed  to  the  anchor  detail,  and the  anchor  is  dropped. As  the  anchor  is  let  go,  the  navigator  should  immediately  call  for  a round  of  bearings  to  be  taken,  and  he  or  she  should  record  the  ship’s head.  After  the  resulting  fix  is  plotted,  a  line  is  extended  from  it  in  the direction  of  the  ship’s  head,  and  the  hawsepipe  to  pelorus  distance  is laid  off  along  the  line,  thus  plotting  the  position  of  the  anchor  at  the moment  that  it  was  let  go.  If  all  has  gone  well,  the  anchor  should  have been  placed  within  50  yards  of  the  center  of  the  anchorage. Post  Anchoring After  the  anchor  has  been  let  go,  the  chain  is  let  out  or  "veered"  until  a Procedure length  or  "scope"  of  chain  5  to  7  times  the  depth  of  water  is  reached. At  this  point,  the  chain  is  secured  and  the  engines  are  backed,  causing the  flukes  of  the  anchor  to  dig  into  the  bottom,  thereby  "setting"  the anchor. When  the  navigator  receives  the  word  that  the  chain  has  been  let  out  to its  full  precomputed  length  and  that  the  anchor  appears  to  be  holding round  of  bearings  and  the  ship’s  head,  as  well  as  the  direction  in  which the  chain  is  tending.  With  this  information,  the  navigator  plots  another fix  and  recomputes  the  position  of  the  anchor  by  laying  off  the  sum  of the  hawsepipe  to  pelorus  distance  plus  the  scope  of  chain  in  the direction  in  which  the  chain  is  tending.  This  second  calculation  of  the position  of  the  anchor  is  necessary  because  it  may  have  been  dragged some  distance  from  its  initial  position  during  the  process  of  setting  the anchor. 12-18

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