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Types of Lights and Light Structures, Continued - 14220_116
Types of Lights and Light Structures, Continued Ranges continued For  a  given  range,  the  true  bearing  of  the  range  axis  will  be  listed  in column  2  of  the  Light  List  immediately  below  the  name  of  the  rear range.  As  you  approach  this  range  and  line  up  the  lights  and  daymarks as  shown  in  figure  4-6,  you  are  on  channel  centerline.  In  figure  4-6,  if the  channel  axis  is  listed  as  020°  and  your  ship  has  the  markers  in  line, your  gyro  compass  should  read  020°.  If  it  does  not,  the  difference  in degrees  will  equal  your  gyro  error. While  the  range  markers  discussed  above  are  precisely  positioned  to mark  a  channel,  you  should  also  be  aware  that  natural  ranges  are  also used  on  occasion.  For  example,  a  tank  and  a  radio  antenna,  when observed  in  line,  may  form  a  natural  range  marking  safe  water. Directional Lights In  certain  situations  where  range  lights  are  desirable  but  not  practicable to  build,  a  less  effective,  but  generally  accepted  substitute  known  as  a directional  light  is  used.  A  directional  light  illuminates  a  sector  or displays  a  very  narrow  angle  light  beam  for  a  ship  to  follow.  In  some cases,  three  colors  of  light  are  used.  A  high  intensity  white  light  will  be bordered  on  each  side  with  a  green  and  red  light.  The  green  sector  will mark  the  side  of  the  channel  with  green  buoys,  and  the  red  sector  marks the  side  with  red  buoys.  Remaining  in  the  white  sector  keeps  you  in  the channel. Figure   4-7.   Daymarks. 4-17

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