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Wind, Continued - 14220_318
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Wind, Continued - 14220_320
Wind, Continued Visual Estimation  of Wind  Speed True  wind  direction  may  be  observed  by  noting  the  direction  from  which ripples,  small  waves,  and  sea  spray  are  coming.  The  direction  is  most easily  found  by  sighting  along  the  wave  crests  and  turning  90°  to  face the  advancing  waves.  The  observer  is  then  facing  the  true  wind direction.  You  may  estimate  the  true  wind  speed  by  noting  the  sea condition  and  referring  to  table  10-1,  which  is  based  upon  the  following assumptions  and  should  be  considered  in  arriving  at  an  estimated  true wind speed: 1.  The  wind  has  been  blowing  at  a  relatively  constant  speed  and direction  for  the  time  indicated  by  table  10-1. 2.  The  fetch  area  (an  area  where  waves  are  being  generated  by  the wind)  is  unlimited. Some  factors  that  cause  the  speed  estimation  of  the  wind  to  be  too  low are  as  follows: 1.  Winds  have  increased  rapidly. 2.  Offshore  winds  within  the  sight  of  land. 3.  Moderate  or  heavy  precipitation  smoothing  the  sea  surface. 4.  Swell  waves  from  varying  directions. Some  factors  that  will  cause  the  speed  estimation  of  the  wind  to  be  to high  are  as  follows: 1.  Waves  running  into  shallow  water. 2.  A  decreasing  wind  speed.  The  relative  wind  speed  and  direction  can be  estimated  by  observing  the  ship’s  flag,  smoke,  and  rigging  on  the windward  side  of  the  ship.  Table  10-1  should  be  used  when  you  are using  this  method.  Notice  that  this  method  gives  you  the  relative  wind and  should  be  used  only  when  the  surface  of  the  sea  cannot  be  observed. 10-23

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