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General Duties of the QMOW, Continued - 14221_370
General Duties of the QMOW, Continued Making Reports After  each  fix,  you  are  required  to  make  reports  of  the  ship’s  position  to to the OOD the  OOD.  When  reporting,  it  is  normal  to  report  whether  the  ship  is  on track,  the  distance  left  or  right  of  track,  course  and  speed  the  ship  is making  good,  any  set  and  drift  encountered,  recommended  course  and speed  changes,  and  estimated  time  of  arrival  at  the  next  departure  point (A,  B,  C,  and  so  on)  or  rendezvous. As  you  can  see,  there  is  quite  a  bit  of  information  to  report.  To  gather the  required  information,  you  will  have  to  evaluate  two  or  more  fixes. This  is  a  simple  task  that  only  takes  a  few  minutes  with  a  little  practice. Let’s  break  the  evaluation  down  into  sections,  beginning  with  where  the ship  is  in  relation  to  track. As  you  know,  a  ship  steers  a  course  to  follow  the  track  to  its destination.  The  bow  is  actually  always  falling  off  left  or  right  of  course and  then  the  helmsman  uses  the  rudders  to  correct.  This  is  due  mainly to  wind  and  current.  Rarely  does  a  fix  fall  exactly  on  the  ship’s  track. To  determine  how  far  off  track  the  ship  has  gotten,  simply  use  the dividers  to  measure  the  distance  left  or  right,  90°  to  the  track,  and  jot down  the  results. To  find  the  course  and  speed  made  good  since  the  last  fix,  use  the parallel  rulers  and  compass  rose  or  PMP  aligned  on  the  last  two  fixes  to find  the  course  made  good  (CMG).  Measure  the  distance  between  the last  two  fixes  to  find  the  speed  made  good  (SMG).  Remember  from earlier  chapters  to  use  the  time,  speed,  and  distance  triangle.  Distance divided  by  time  equals  speed.  Jot  down  your  results.  We  now  have  two elements  of  our  report.  The  next  element  to  find  is  set  and  drift. Set  and  Drift:  What  exactly  is  set  and  drift?  Well,  the  term  set  means the  direction  in  which  the  ship  is  being  pushed  off  course.  Drift  is  the speed  or  velocity  that  the  ship  is  being  pushed  off  course. You  will  need  recommended  courses  and  speed  changes  to  offset  the effects  of  set  and  drift.  In  some  cases,  it  may  be  necessary  steer  several degrees  left  or  right  of  the  desired  course  to  make  that  course  good. Once  again,  keep  in  mind  that  set  and  drift  are  directly  related  to  the amount  of  wind  and  current.  Let’s  work  an  example  problem  to  find  the value  of  set  and  drift. 11-37

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