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Altitude  Corrections,  Continued - 14221_279
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Quartermaster 3 & 2 - Military manual for the Quartermaster rate
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How to Reduce a Sunline Using Pub 229, Continued - 14221_281
How to Reduce a Sunline Using Pub 229 Gather Information As  with  any  celestial  observation,  you  must  gather  data  to  reduce  to  an LOP.  With  a  sextant  and  recorder  you  will  need  the  following: date/GMT  of  sight,  DR  position,  sextant  altitude  (hs),  height  of  eye  of the  observer,  and  IC  correction. Procedure For  our  example  we  will  use  the  following: Date: 31  March  1984 Lat: 36°  32.8'N hs: 25° 46.9’ Hgt  of  Eye:  50  ft GMT: 09 15 38 Long:  018°  10.0'  W IC: - 1.0 After  applying  altitude  corrections  we  have  determined  Ho  =  25°  53.3'. We  can  now  use  the  Pub  229  strip  form  to  complete  the  process  of reducing;  at  this  point  we  have  completed  stage  1.  We  can  move  on  to the  next  stage  of  finding  LHA. Notice  that  to  find  LHA,  we  follow  the  same  steps  as  we  did  for  our azimuth  of  the  Sun  problem  only  slightly  different.  Here’s  the  key difference.  We  want  to  arrive  at  an  even  number  LHA.  To  do  this,  we will  use  an  assumed  longitude. This  step  will  help  us  in  interpolation later  in  this  problem. There  is  a  catch  though;  the  following  rule  must be  adhered  to  when  finding  an  assumed  longitude. Rule:  The  assumed  longitude  used  as  an  assumed  position  must  be within  30'  of  the  original  DR  longitude. Trick  of  the  trade:  When  finding  your  assumed  longitude,  simply  drop the  minutes  of  total  GHA  down,  then  add  the  whole  degree  of  longitude that  is  within  30'  of  the  DR  longitude.  Look  at  our  example  problem where  we  dropped  the  52.2'  down  from  the  total  GHA.  If  we  were  to use  the  18°  from  the  original  DR  long.  of  18°  10.0,  which  would  be  18° 52.2'  it  would  be  more  than  30',  so  we  changed  the  18°  to  17°  and  all’s well. Let’s  begin  working  our  problem  on  the  next  page. 9-24

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