Quantcast Magnetic  Compass  Operation  and  Components - 14221_61

Click Here to
Order this information in Print

Click Here to
Order this information on CD-ROM

Click Here to
Download this information in PDF Format

 

Click here to make tpub.com your Home Page

Page Title: Magnetic Compass Operation and Components
Back | Up | Next

Click here for a printable version

Google


Web
www.tpub.com

Home

   
Information Categories
.... Administration
Advancement
Aerographer
Automotive
Aviation
Combat
Construction
Diving
Draftsman
Engineering
Electronics
Food and Cooking
Math
Medical
Music
Nuclear Fundamentals
Photography
Religion
USMC
   
Products
  Educational CD-ROM's
Printed Manuals
Downloadable Books

   


 

Share on Google+Share on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on TwitterShare on DiggShare on Stumble Upon
Back
Standard  and  Steering  Compasses - 14221_60
Up
Quartermaster 3 & 2 - Military manual for the Quartermaster rate
Next
Magnetic  Compass  Operation  and  Components,  Continued - 14221_62
Magnetic  Compass  Operation  and  Components Operation The operation of a magnetic compass is very simple and can be stated as follows:  "A  small  bar  magnet  freely  suspended  in  the  magnetic  field  of Earth  will  always  align  itself  parallel  to  the  lines  of  force  of  that  field  and thus  will  establish  a  direction." Components Use  the  following  table,  figure  2-6,  and  figure  2-7  to  learn  the  parts  of  a magnetic  compass. Part Card Bowl Magnets Gimbals Binnacle Function The  card  is  an  aluminum  disk  graduated  in  degrees from  0  to  359.  It  has  a  jeweled  bearing  that  rides  on  a hard,  sharp  pivot  point. The  card  is  supported  by  the  bowl.  A  lubbers  line  is marked  on  the  bowl  and  is  used  as  visible  index.  The bowl  is  filled  with  Varsol  to  dampen  overswings  by  the card.  An  expansion  bellows  in  the  lower  bowl  serves to  allow  expansion  of  the  liquid  with  temperature changes. Several  bar  magnets  are  used  to  correct  and  align  the compass. The  bowl  has  two  pivots  that  rest  in  a  metal  ring, which  also  has  two  pivots  resting  in  the  binnacle.  This arrangement  (gimbals)  permits  the  compass  to  remain level despite the motion of the ship. The binnacle serves as a housing for the compass.   It   is made of a non- magnetic  material. It also serves as a housing  for  the compasses correctors: magnets,  flinders bar,  and  quadrantal spheres.   A   lighting system is normally Figure 2-6. Compass binnacle installed. 2-7

Privacy Statement - Press Release - Copyright Information. - Contact Us - Support Integrated Publishing

Integrated Publishing, Inc.
6230 Stone Rd, Unit Q Port Richey, FL 34668

Phone For Parts Inquiries: (727) 493-0744
Google +