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Planning and Constructing Restricted Water Tracks, Continued - 14221_384
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Quartermaster 3 & 2 - Military manual for the Quartermaster rate
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Figure 12+7. Example restricted water track
Planning  and  Constructing  Restricted  Water  Tracks,  Continued Constructing the   In  the  following  table,  you’ll  find  all  of  the  steps  listed  to  construct  the Restricted restricted  water  track.  This  list  assumes  that  all  information  has  been Water Track obtained  about  the  port. Step Action 1. Mark  all  red  and  yellow  soundings. 2. Lay  down  intended  tracks.  Normally,  the  intended  track  is  laid down  in  the  middle  of  the  channel  (see  fig.  12-7).  The  only exceptions  are  very  wide  channels  with  mid-channel  buoys  where the  track  is  laid  in  the  center  of  one-half  of  the  channel. Turn  points  are  normally  established  by  the  intersection  of  two course  lines  that  have  been  laid  for  different  legs  of  the  track. 3. Label  all  courses,  speeds,  and  distances. 4. Check  for  hidden  dangers;  construct  danger  bearings  if  necessary. 5. Create  turn  bearings  for  each  turn.  Remember  to  use  lighted NAVAIDs  where  possible. 6. Highlight  all  NAVAIDs  and  radar  points;  record  in  the  Standard Bearing  Book. 7. On  several  areas  of  the  overall  track,  display  forecasted  wind  and current  data.  This  may  done  by  drawing  arrows  that  point  in  the direction  of  wind  or  current  with  the  force  labeled.  Alternately, you  may  cut  out  arrows  labeled  with  the  information  and  then  use tape  to  stick  the  arrows  to  the  chart. Note:    On  larger  deep  draft  vessels,  1  knot  of  current  can  equal about  the  same  as  10  knots  of  wind.  Strong  winds  along  with 1  knot  or  more  of  current  may  make  larger  vessels  crab  up  a channel. 12-11

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