Quantcast Accident Cost

Click Here to
Order this information in Print

Click Here to
Order this information on CD-ROM

Click Here to
Download this information in PDF Format

 

Click here to make tpub.com your Home Page

Page Title: Accident Cost
Back | Up | Next

Click here for a printable version

Google


Web
www.tpub.com

Home

   
Information Categories
.... Administration
Advancement
Aerographer
Automotive
Aviation
Combat
Construction
Diving
Draftsman
Engineering
Electronics
Food and Cooking
Math
Medical
Music
Nuclear Fundamentals
Photography
Religion
USMC
   
Products
  Educational CD-ROM's
Printed Manuals
Downloadable Books

   


 

Share on Google+Share on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on TwitterShare on DiggShare on Stumble Upon
Back
Ladder Chute
Up
Ships Serviceman 2 - How to fix and repair boats
Next
Danger Areas - 14238_80
Figure  4-9.—Manual  lifting. bulky object close to you. The best way to handle a compact load is to squat down close to the load with  one  foot  alongside  it  and  the  other  foot behind it. With the feet comfortably spread, you will have better stability with the rear foot in the position  for  the  upward  thrust  of  the  lift. 3.  Pull  the  load  toward  you,  then  lift  it gradually.  Avoid  quick  and  jerky  motions.  Push upon your legs while keeping your back straight. A straight back keeps the spine, back muscles, and other organs of the body in the correct alignment. Tucking in your chin helps to align the spine. No matter what size the load, get as close to it as you can; then get a good grip by using the full palm and extending your fingers and hands around the object.  Remember  that  your  fingers  have  very little  power  and  need  the  strength  of  the  entire hand. Keep your arms and elbows tucked into the side  of  your  body  to  help  keep  the  body  weight centered. Avoid twisting your body during the lift or  while  moving  the  load;  change  directions  by moving  your  feet.  Twisting  your  body  during  a lift  is  one  of  the  most  common  causes  of  back injury. 4.  Be  sure  you  have  a  clear  vision  over  the load  you  are  carrying. 5.  Do  NOT  change  your  grip  while  carrying the  load. 6.  Face  the  spot  on  which  you  intend  to  set the  object  down;  bend  your  knees  keeping  your back as straight as possible and the weight of the object  close  to  your  body. 7. Always allow enough room for the load to prevent  injury  to  your  toes  and  fingers. 8. When you are placing a load on a table or bench, set it down on the edge and push it forward with your arms and body. If the load is too heavy or  too  awkward  for  you  to  move  alone—GET HELP!  Remember,  LIFT  WITH  YOUR  LEGS, NOT   WITH   YOUR   BACK! SAFETY Safety is discussed throughout this manual and cannot  be  overemphasized  in  any  phase  of  the ship’s store operation. The safety precautions for the  handling  of  materials  are  contained  in  the Navy   Safety   Precautions   For   Forces   Afloat, OPNAVINST  5100.19,  chapter  2,  section  2. Material handling involves dangerous opera- tions   that   require   implementing   safe   work practices.   The   supervisor   of   the   materials- handling  operations  is  responsible  for  making  sure all   personnel   under   his   or   her   control   are instructed in and carry out all safety precautions. The personnel actually involved in the operations are   also   responsible   for   the   safety   of   other personnel  and  equipment  and  should  remain  alert at  all  times  to  guard  against  possible  injury  to themselves  or  others,  or  damage  to  equipment. ACCIDENT  COST Accidents  involving  personnel  can  have  an adverse  effect  on  productive  man-hours  and planned production schedules. Personnel are not always   easily   replaced   aboard   ship   and   your division   may   go   short   for   months   before   a replacement  is  obtained  and  then  the  replacement may  not  be  as  skillful  as  the  person  lost. When  material  is  damaged  or  destroyed  by accidents, time and money is spent to accomplish necessary  repairs  or  replacement  of  equipment. Other  consequences  include  delays  in  getting  work done,  longer  working  hours,  and  possible  shortage of  critical  material. CAUSES  OF  ACCIDENTS Primarily   accidents   are   caused   by   people. Equipment is usually involved, but people handle the  equipment.  Most  accidents  are  the  result  of carelessness,  inexperience,  and  attitude. 4-11

Privacy Statement - Press Release - Copyright Information. - Contact Us - Support Integrated Publishing

Integrated Publishing, Inc.