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Appendix 1, Continued - 14239_168
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Appendix 1, Continued - 14239_170
COMPOSITE   RECREATION   FUND—A fund in which a ship without a ship’s store shares in the profits of the supporting ship’s store. For example,   an   SSN/SSBN   supported   by   an   AS receives  a  share  of  the  ship’s  store  profits  from the AS to be used as the SSN/SSBN’s recreation fund. CONSTANTS—Data maintained in a central file in the ROM system that is used repetitively to  produce  various  reports  and  forms. COOL-DOWN  CYCLE—The  final  portion  of the  actual  drying  cycle;  the  cool-down  timer  on the  tumbler  dryer  is  set  for  10  minutes,  the dampers are moved to the cool position, and the dryer  load  is  cooled  down  to  approximately 120°F. COST  ITEM—An  item  of  ship’s  store  stock carried for ultimate issue as cost of operations and cost  of  sales. COST  OF  OPERATIONS  ISSUE—An  ex- penditure  of  stock  for  ultimate  consumption  in a  ship’s  store  activity. COST   OF   OPERATIONS   ITEMS—Cost items  carried  for  ultimate  issue  to  ship’s  store activities  and  for  which  cash  is  not  ultimately received. COST   OF   SALES   ITEMS—Cost   items carried  for  issue  to  a  sales  outlet.  Cash  is ultimately received for cost of sales items. They differ from retail items in that further processing is  required  before  sale. COST  PRICE—The  price  at  which  an  item is  received  from  the  supplier.  Standard  Navy clothing   is   sold   and   issued   at   cost   price. Cost  of  operations  items  are  issued  at  cost price. COTTON—A   soft,   white   fibrous   substance with a cellulose base that is used to make cotton fabrics. CUSTODIAN  (RESPONSIBLE  CUSTO- DIAN)—A   person   held   responsible   for   the operation  of  a  sales  outlet  and  strict  custody  of the material used in it. CUSTODY—Responsibility  for  proper  care, storage,  use,  and  records  of  Navy  material. CYLINDER—Part   of   the   washer   extractor that  has  three  pockets  to  hold  clothes  and  is perforated to allow water and suds in the bottom of the shell to enter and clean clothes during the wash  cycle. CYLINDER  DOOR—Door  that  allows  the laundry   person   access   to   each   pocket   in   the cylinder. DACRON—A   synthetic   fiber. DAILY  RECORD  OF  VENDING  MACHINE DRINKS—Locally developed form placed on the inside of each vending machine that lists the date, flavor,  and  amount  of  sodas  placed  in  the  machine when it is refilled. DAMP  BOX—A  box  used  to  stow  trousers and  shirts  and  keep  them  damp  while  they  are waiting  to  be  pressed. DAMPERS—   Dampers   that   regulate   the temperature  of  the  air  coming  into  the  tumbler dryer. DELIVERY  TABLE—Table  that  catches  all material  discharged  from  the  flatwork  ironer. DEODORIZING  CYCLE—Last  cycle  of  the dry-cleaning  process  where  the  clothes  in  the  dry- cleaning  machine  are  treated  with  a  stream  of fresh  air  to  strip  away  any  remaining  odor  or solvent  vapor. DEPARTMENT  CODE—A  code  by  which ship’s  store  merchandise  is  identified  by categories; listed in appendix B of the ROM TUG. DETERGENT/OXYGEN   BLEACH—A   mix- ture  used  for  laundering  cotton,  synthetic,  and blended  clothing  items  in  either  fresh  water  or seawater.  Commonly  referred  to  as  two-shot detergent. DISTILLATION—The process in which used or   impure   solvent   that   contains   an   excessive amount of impurities is heated to approximately 250°F   and   vaporized.   The   impurities,   mostly solvent,  soluble,  nonvolatile,  boil  at  a  much higher temperature; thus as the solvent is boiled off,  the  impurities  are  left  behind  where  they remain  in  the  bottom  of  the  still  in  the  dry- cleaning  unit.  The  solvent  vapors,  now  free  of impurities,  run  over  cold  pipes  to  lower  their AI-3

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