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Figure 6-4. Dry-Cleaning Press
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Trouser Tops
on   the   setting   of   the   temperature   on   the thermostat.   Until   the   temperature   setting   is reached,  the  drying  cycle  continues  (normally about   12   minutes).   The   temperature   setting, depending on the garment, should be set between 140°  to  150°F. 6.  Once  the  desired  temperature  is  reached and the bulk of the solvent reclaimed, the clothes are treated with a stream of fresh air. This portion of  the  dry-cleaning  process  is  the  deodorizing  cycle that  strips  away  any  remaining  odor  or  solvent vapor  that  may  still  be  left  in  the  clothes. DRY-CLEANING  PRESSES Dry-cleaning  presses  have  perforated  metal heads  and  bucks  through  which  steam  is  admitted by the operator. The heads are normally covered with  a  perforated,  thin,  metal  mask,  which  is sometimes  also  covered  with  a  moleskin  type  of fabric to prevent a gloss on pressed articles. The bucks  are  usually  padded  and  are  then  covered with   a   perforated   metal   mask   and   a   cloth covering. Presses used for dry cleaning aboard ship are listed  in  the  Navy   Laundry   and   Dry-cleaning Catalog, NAVSEA S6152-B1-CAT-010. There are two  general  utility  dry-cleaning  presses  listed,  one made  by  Ajax  and  the  other  by  Florenta.  The Ajax  model  is  shown  in  figure  6-4.  This  model is very easy to operate. After dressing an article on the buck, the operator raises the head closing bar  to  close  the  head.  Then,  pressing  the  head locking handle with the other hand, the operator locks  the  head  in  the  pressing  position.  Simply pressing  the  table-mounted  release  button  will open the head at anytime. Steam can be provided to the head by pressing the steam handle located on  the  head,  and  buck  steam  and  vacuum  are supplied  by  depressing  the  two  foot  pedals. The  Florenta  dry-cleaning  press  uses  the  hand control  buttons  in  conjunction  with  the  safety control   bar.   The   operator   pushes   the   black buttons on each side of the worktable facing with both  hands.  This  will  close  the  pressing  head unless  the  safety  control  bar  contacts  an  object or  the  buttons  are  released  before  the  head  is closed.  To  open  the  press  head,  the  operator simply lifts up on the safety control bar and the press head will open to the full position. The two control  buttons  on  the  worktable  facing  are  not used in the opening of the pressing head. The head steam and buck steam and vacuum are operated in  the  same  manner  as  previously  described. Synthetic uniforms should not be pressed on HOT  HEAD  presses  (uncovered  polished  steel). Synthetics  cannot  withstand  high  temperatures and, therefore, should be done on a dry-cleaning press. Steam  lines  under  no  more  than  75  to  80 pounds  per  square  inch  pressure  should  be connected  to  dry-cleaning  presses.  At  this  pres- sure  the  proper  amount  of  moisture  and  heat is  available  to  properly  press  the  item  of apparel. CAUTION   is   required   in   pressing   fabrics containing   high   percentages   of   either   Dacron polyester  fibers  or  Orion  acrylic  fibers  because control   of   temperature,   pressure,   and   time is   important.   For   best   results   100   percent Dacron   and   Orlon   fabrics   should   be   pressed at temperatures around 275°F with low mechani- cal  pressure  and  short  intervals  of  time.  In blends of Dacron with wool, higher temperatures may  be  used  provided  the  mechanical  pressure and  contact  time  are  kept  at  a  minimum. Improper  pressing  techniques  may  result  in a  shiny,  watered,  clouded,  or  frosted  appear- ance,   needle   holes,   and   difficulty   in   alter- ing  the  finished  garment  at  some  later  date. If   high   steam   pressures   are   used,   it   is doubtful  that  pressed  seams  can  subsequently be  altered.  Permanent  damage  results  from the  defects  discussed  above  because  they  can- not  be  removed  by  sponging  or  other  treat- ment. PRESS LAYS In  machine  pressing,  each  garment  is  finished by a series of lays. Each lay is a position of the garment on the buck, and the series should cover the  entire  garment.  Places  on  the  garment  that cannot  be  pressed  with  the  machine  should  be smoothed  out  by  inserting  a  puff  (pad)  and pressing the spot against the head of the press or by  using  a  hand  iron. All  pressers  do  not  follow  the  same  pattern for pressing the same article. Generally there is not  much  variation  in  different  lays.  Sequences of  lays  for  trousers  tops  and  legs,  jumpers,  and uniform   coats   are   described   in   the   following pages.  The  ones  given  are  considered  the minimum   for   each   article   when   high-quality pressing is desired. 6-9

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