Quantcast Identifying Spots and Stains

Click Here to
Order this information in Print

Click Here to
Order this information on CD-ROM

Click Here to
Download this information in PDF Format

 

Click here to make tpub.com your Home Page

Page Title: 14239_160
Back | Up | Next

Click here for a printable version

Google


Web
www.tpub.com

Home

   
Information Categories
.... Administration
Advancement
Aerographer
Automotive
Aviation
Combat
Construction
Diving
Draftsman
Engineering
Electronics
Food and Cooking
Math
Medical
Music
Nuclear Fundamentals
Photography
Religion
USMC
   
Products
  Educational CD-ROM's
Printed Manuals
Downloadable Books

   


 

Share on Google+Share on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on TwitterShare on DiggShare on Stumble Upon
Back
Sleeveboard
Up
Ships Serviceman 3 - How to fix and repair boats
Next
Table  6-3.—Chemicals  Used  in  Spotting
chamois  cloths  or  Turkish  towels  available  for  this purpose. Cheesecloth and Blotters Cheesecloth, because it is soft and absorbent, is used in spotting or feathering out—picking up all the moisture around a spot just removed. This prevents  rings  from  forming.  Chamois,  because of its heavy texture, is not good for feathering out. You can use blotters for absorbing materials rinsed from the garment. You can also use them to  test  the  resistance  of  dyes  in  fabrics  to  cleaning chemicals  and/or  spotting  agents.  Put  a  small portion   of   fabric   on   a   blotter   and   apply   the chemical   or   spotting   agent.   The   amount   of coloring  matter  dissolved  by  the  chemical  and absorbed by the blotter indicates the effect of the chemical  on  the  dye. Magnifying  Glass When  in  doubt  about  the  substance  that caused a spot or stain, a spotter may examine it under  a  magnifying  glass.  Although  an  inex- perienced  spotter  may  get  few  results  with  a magnifying  glass  at  first,  through  practice  the spotter will learn to identify various substances as  they  appear  when  magnified. The  magnifying  glass  is  used  to  observe  the weave  and  imperfections  of  the  fabric  and  to determine if a discoloration on the garment is a spot or damaged fibers. It helps to determine the kind  of  spot  or  stain  and  to  observe  the  action of  the  spotting  chemical.  The  glass  can  also  be used to determine whether a spot has a staining substance or whether the spot has a chafed area with loss of dye. The magnifying glass will help you determine if the stained area is too weak to stand treatment and if a spot on a synthetic fabric was  caused  by  heat  damage. Soap Solution Containers Usually  each  spotting  board  has  two  con- tainers  to  hold  soap  solutions.  The  containers should  be  cleaned  daily. Spotting Bottles and Agents Spotting bottles and chemical agents are held in a tray at the right end of the spotting board. Dropper bottles with ground glass stoppers and rubber  bulk  pipettes  are  preferred.  These  types of  bottles  control  the  chemicals  and  conserve materials. However, on board ship, squeeze-type containers  with  a  dropper  top  have  been  found to be more convenient and satisfactory from the standpoint  of  handling  and  breakage.  The chemical agents commonly used to remove spots and   stains   are   listed   in   table   6-3.   Their characteristics  and  uses  are  given,  and  also  the precautions  you  should  take  with  them. IDENTIFYING  SPOTS  AND  STAINS Once you have learned the basic uses of the equipment, tools, and chemical agents, you must be  able  to  determine  what  the  spot  or  stain  is before you try to remove it. Through experience as  a  spotter,  you  will  be  able  to  easily  identify spots  and  stains.  Until  you  learn,  you  must  be careful because if you try to remove a spot or stain before  properly  identifying  it  you  may  damage  the clothing by using the wrong chemical or spotting technique.  Listed  below  are  several  ways  to identify  a  spot: Sight—Sight  is  the  most  important  and  the quickest way to identify a spot or stain. Is the spot built up, built up and absorbed, or absorbed and visible  on  the  back  side?  What  is  its  shape?  Is it  dull  or  shiny,  smooth-  or  rough-surfaced, or   is   it   rugged   with   uneven   edges?   What   is the  color? Feeling—Is   the   spot   hard,   soft,   sticky,   or brittle?  Does  it  become  white  when  scratched? Odor—Sometimes  the  odor  is  so  prominent that positive identification of the spot or stain is possible   without   the   use   of   other   guides. Sometimes a drop of water or a feather of steam is   required   to   intensify   the   odor   so   you   can positively  identify  what  it  is. Location—Food  spots  are  usually  found  on the front of the garment and on the underside of cuffs  and  sleeves.  Perspiration  stains  are  found under arms, across the back and shoulders, knees, and   the   seat   of   trousers.   Leg   makeup,   mud, and  shoe  polish  are  found  on  the  lower  part of  the  skirt  and  coats  or  legs  and  cuffs  of trousers. Solvent  test—Solvent  tests  are  used  to determine  whether  the  spot  or  stain  should  be removed  by  water  or  dry  solvent.  If  the appearance  indicates  the  spot  or  stain  was  spread 6-24

Privacy Statement - Press Release - Copyright Information. - Contact Us - Support Integrated Publishing

Integrated Publishing, Inc.