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Types of Oral Questions - 14300_58
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Techniques of Oral Questioning - 14300_60
purposes.   For   example,   you   could   use   a   factual   question   to   arouse   interest,   to   focus   attention upon  certain  parts  of  the  subject  matter,  and  to  assist  in  determining  the  level  of  instruction. Thought-Provoking   Question A   thought-provoking   question   normally   begins   with   such   interrogatory   expressions   as   “What is  the  advantage  of,”  “What  is  the  difference  between,”  “Why   is   this   method   considered   superior to,”  “ How  would  you  solve  the  problem  if,”  and  so  forth.  The  value  of  this  type  of  question  is that  a  single  question,  properly  used  will  stimulate  the  students  to  think.  Prepare  good, thought-provoking   questions   on   key   lesson   points   in   advance. Interest-Arousing    Question An  interest-arousing  question  may  sound,  superficially,  like  a  factual  question.  “How  many Navy  ships  were  involved  in  collisions  at  sea  during  the  past  year?”  Since  the  question  calls  for an  exact  number,  students  will  doubtless  attempt  to  recall  the  collisions  about  which  they  have read   or   heard.   When   asking   an   interest-arousing   question,   however,   you   are   not   interested   in exact   numbers,   exact   names   of   ships,   or   exact   situations.   Your   main   purpose   in   asking   the question  is  to  focus  the  students’  attention  and  get  them  thinking  about  the  subject  you  are about  to  present. Multiple-Answer   Question A  multiple-answer  question  is  one  that  has  more  than  one  correct  answer.  It  can  be  used  to increase   student   participation   or   cause   students   to   think   about   the   other   students’   answers.   A multiple-answer   question   generates   a   high   interest   level   and   improves   listening   skills. A   factual,   thought-provoking,   or   multiple-answer   question   may   also   be   one   that   is interest-arousing.   That   depends   upon   your   intention   in   asking   the   question,   not   upon   its   form or   content.   However,   if   you   overestimate   the   knowledge   of   your   students,   a   question   intended to  be  factual  may  turn  out  to  be  thought-provoking. If   you   underestimate   the   students’ knowledge,  a  question  intended  to  be  thought-provoking  may  turn  out  to  be  factual. As  previously  mentioned,  certain  kinds  of  questions  are  effective  if  used  occasionally  but  are detrimental   if   used   frequently.   Typical   of   these   types   of   questions   are   the   yes   or   no   question, the  leading  question,  and  the  canvassing  question. Yes/No   Question The  yes  or  no  question,  of  course,  calls  for  a  simple  answer--yes  or  no.  This  type  of  question has  value  in  arousing  interest,  focusing  attention,  encouraging  student  participation,  and  serving as  a  lead-in  to  other  kinds  of  questions,  such  as  “Why  do  you  believe  that  to  be  true?”  An excessive   use   of   yes   or   no   questions   tends   to   encourage   students   to   guess. 47

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