Quantcast Lesson Presentation - 14300_31

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Applying Motivation Techniques to Instruction
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Lesson Summary - 14300_32
Attention-getting   methods   for   beginning   a   lesson: n   Focus   on   the   importance   of   the   subject. n   Use   startling   statistics. n  Ask  rhetorical  questions.  A  rhetorical  question  is  one  you  direct  at  the  students  but  do not  really  expect  them  to  answer.  (Have  you  ever  .  .  .  ?  Can  you  imagine  .  .  .  ?) n   Use   quotations. A   striking   quotation   will   arouse   interest,   particularly   one   by   a well--known person. i  Ask  overhead  questions.  An  overhead  question  is  an  interest-arousing  question  directed to  the  entire  class. n   Tell   a   story.   A   story   is   an   interesting   way   of   introducing   a   lesson,   especially   when   it relates   to   experiences   students   have   had.   While   humor   may   be   appropriate,   don’t   tell irrelevant  stories,  jokes,  or  incidents  that  distract  from  the  lesson. All   of   these   attention--getting   devices   are   potentially   useful   during   the   lesson   introduction. However,  decide  which  ones  to  use  based  solely  on  the  subject  and  the  students.  Your  primary concern  is  to  focus  student  attention  on  the  subject.  The  introduction  to  a  lesson,  no  matter what  form  the  lesson  plan  takes,  must  accomplish  certain  goals: n  Develop  students’  interest. n  State  the  lesson  objectives  and  their  significance. n   Direct   student   thinking   along   desired   lines. n  Outline  the  scope  of  the  lesson. n  Show  students  the  value  of  the  subject  matter. n  Explain  the  method  or  methods  you  will  use. n  Let  the  students  know  what  you  expect  of  them. After  you  have  won  the  attention  of  the  students,  you  must  direct  them  to  the  subject  of  the lesson. LESSON    PRESENTATION To   maintain   student   interest,   do  not  read  a  lesson  plan  verbatim.  Make  sure  you  are thoroughly  familiar  with  the  material  you  are  presenting.  Know  your  lesson  plan  as  well  as  the information  in  the  references  from  which  you  will  teach.  To  meet  the  specific  objectives  of  the lesson,  you  must  know  exactly  what  you  are  going  to  teach  and  how  you  are  going  to  teach  it. Further,   you   must   be   careful   not   to   overteach;   that   is,   to   provide   extraneous   information merely  because  you  are  knowledgeable  in  a  particular  area. Present   the   material   in   a   logical   sequence   beginning   with   the   known   and   moving   to   the unknown.   Although   slight   variations   and   excursions   off   the   main   line   of   a   lesson   can   promote interest,  keep  them  to  a  minimum.    During  the  presentation,  one  of  the  best  motivators  is  the use   of   training   aids. 19

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