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The Salute
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Naval Orientation - Military manual for administrative purposes
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When to Salute
stands  at  attention;  looks  the  senior  straight  in the  eye;  and,  depending  upon  the  time  of  day, extends  one  of  the  following  greetings: From first rising until noon: “Good morning, . . . ” From   noon   until   sunset:   “Good   afternoon, . . . ” From sunset until turning in: “Good evening, .  .  .  ” Preferably,  the  junior  should  call  the  senior by  grade  and  name,  such  as  “Commander Jones,”  rather  than  by  the  impersonal  “sir”  or “ma’am.” Naval  custom  permits  saluting  with  the  left hand when you cannot render a salute with the right hand. Army and Air Force custom permits only  right-hand  salutes. Avoid  making  the  following  common  errors in saluting: Bowing  the  head  when  giving  the  salute. Dropping  the  salute  before  it  has  been returned. Holding the arm awkwardly high or letting it sag  too  low. Saluting  while  on  the  double. Avoiding  the  gaze  of  the  person  saluted. Saluting with pipe, cigar, or cigarette in the mouth  or  in  the  hand. Waiting  too  long  to  begin  a  salute. Saluting  in  a  casual  or  perfunctory  manner. WHEN  TO  SALUTE In the Navy, as in practically every military service in the world, everybody salutes–from the bottom to the top of the ranks and down again. Enlisted personnel salute all officers, and every officer salutes seniors. All who are saluted return the salute. When uncovered, the person saluted usually acknowledges a salute by an appropriate oral  greeting  or  nod  of  the  head.  (See  fig.  7-3.) Extend salutes to officers of the Navy, Army, Air  Force,  Marine  Corps,  and  Coast  Guard  and to  foreign  military  officers  whose  governments  are formally  recognized  by  the  government  of  the United States. When in uniform, extend salutes to officers of the Naval, Army, Air Force, Marine Corps,   and   Coast   Guard   Reserves   and   the National   Guard.   Public   Health   Service   and National  Oceanic  and  Atmospheric  Administration officers also rate a salute when serving with the armed  forces  of  the  United  States. When several officers in company are saluted, all  return  the  salute  when  the  senior  officer  in the  company  returns  the  salute  accorded.  For example,  if  an  ensign  is  walking  with  a commander and an Army captain approaches, the ensign  waits  for  the  Army  captain  to  salute  the commander.   As   the   commander   returns   the salute, the ensign salutes simultaneously. If two or more persons of various grades accompany the senior officer, the same rule applies: they render the salute when the senior officer returns the salute accorded. Civilians entitled by reason of their position to  gun  salutes  or  other  honors  also  are  entitled by  custom  to  the  hand  salute. Five  types  of  personal  salutes  are  rendered: hand  salute;  hand  salute  under  arms;  present arms;  sword  salute;  and  “eyes  right,”  given  by personnel passing in review. Aboard  Ship All officer and enlisted personnel on board a ship  of  the  Navy  salute  the  following  officers: All  flag  officers  (officers  above  the  grade  of captain) The   commanding   officer Visiting officers senior to themselves on every occasion  of  meeting,  passing  near,  or  being addressed On the first daily meeting, personnel salute all senior  officers  attached  to  their  ship.  (Many  ships consider  salutes  rendered  at  quarters  to  suffice  for this  first  salute  of  the  day.)  They  salute  when addressing  or  being  addressed  by  seniors.  They also  salute  an  inspecting  officer  during  the  course of  an  official  inspection.  When  the  progress  of a  senior  officer  may  be  impeded,  all  personnel clear  a  path  and  stand  at  attention  facing  the senior  officer  until  he  or  she  has  passed. 7-12

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