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Boat Etiquette - 12966_152
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Naval Orientation - Military manual for administrative purposes
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Aboard Ship
United   States   customs   regulations   explicitly state   that   exemption   from   payment   of   duty   for articles    purchased    abroad    covers    only    articles intended  for  personal  use  of  the  returning  traveler. The  term  personal  use  as  used  in  the  regulations refers  to  articles  purchased  with  the  traveler’s  own money, either for personal use or as a gift to others. The import of large quantities of material, under any agreement   that   permits   transfer   of   goods   after importation,  violates  the  regulations.  Offenders  are liable  to  heavy  fines  as  well  as  to  imprisonment. Travelers    should    keep    an    accurate    record    of purchases  made  abroad  so  that  they  can  make  a correct customs declaration. The prices actually paid for articles purchased abroad, either in the currency of the country where purchased or the equivalent in United   States   currency,   must   be   stated   in   the customs declaration. THE SALUTE One of the essentials  of  military  courtesy  is  the salute. Regulations governing its  use are founded on military etiquette and, as  such,  are  deeply  rooted  in traditions  and  customs  of  the  service.   A   military organization functions efficiently only as a unit, and any common bond or identifying symbol that furthers the feeling of comradeship strengthens that unity. The   custom    of    saluting    is    a    time-honored demonstration  of  courtesy  among  military  personnel the world over. It expresses mutual respect and pride in the military service. In  form,  the  salute  is  simple  and  dignified,  but that  gesture  has  great  significance.  The  privilege  of saluting  is  generally  denied  prisoners  because  their status  is  unworthy  of  the  comradeship  of  military personnel. The  salute  probably  originated  in  the  days  of chivalry,   when   knights   in   mail   (flexible   armor) customarily   raised   their   visors   to   friends   for   the purpose of identification. Because of strict gradations or  rank,  the  junior  was  required  to  make  the  first gesture.  Another  school  of  thought  traces  the  salute back  to  a  custom  at  the  time  of  the  Borgias.  Since assassinations by dagger were common at that time, men began approaching each other with raised hand, palm to the front, to show they concealed no weapon. In    the    American    Navy,    however,    history indicates  that  the  hand  salute  came  to  use  directly from the British Navy. In the earliest days of British military units, the junior uncovered when meeting or addressing  a  senior.  Gradually,  the  act  of  removing the cap was simplified into merely touching the cap or,  if  uncovered,  the  head  (forelock).  The  act  finally evolved into the present form of salute. PROPER MANNER OF SALUTING Except  when  walking,  stand  at  attention  when saluting.   In   any   case,   turn   your   head   and   eyes toward   the   person   saluted   unless    doing    so    is inappropriate,   such   as   when   a   division   in   ranks salutes  an  inspecting  officer  on  command.  Raise  the right  hand  smartly  until  the  tip  of  the  forefinger touches  the  lower  part  of  the  headgear  or  forehead above and slightly to the right of the right eye. Join and   extend   thumb   and   fingers.   Turn   the   palm slightly inward until the person saluting can just see its surface from the corner of the right eye. Position the upper arm parallel to the ground with the elbow slightly in front of the body. Incline the forearm at a 45-degree angle with the hand and wrist in a straight line.  Complete  the  salute  (after  it  is  returned)  by dropping the arm to its normal position in one sharp, clean motion. (See fig. 7-2.) Execute  the  first  position  of  the  hand  salute when  six  paces  from  the  person  saluted,  or  at  the nearest  point  of  approach,  if  more  than  six  paces. (Thirty   paces   is   generally   regarded   as   maximum saluting  distance.)  Hold  the  first  position  until  the person saluted has passed or returns the salute. According  to  naval  custom,  a  word  of  greeting should accompany the hand salute. The junior Figure 7-2.-Hand salute. 7-11

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