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Commissary and Exchange Privileges
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Naval Orientation - Military manual for administrative purposes
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Recreation and Sports Programs
States.  Spouses  who  meet  necessary  qualifications may  be  hired  locally  for  employment  in  service- operated  schools. Above the high school level, children of naval personnel  are  eligible  for  scholarship  assistance at  a  number  of  colleges  and  universities  in  the United States. OFFICERS’ MESS A commissioned officers’ mess provides social and   recreational   facilities, meals,   and refreshments to commissioned and chief warrant officers. Where facilities permit, privileges of the mess  frequently  are  extended  to  officers  of  the other  armed  services  and  Reserve  officers,  as  well as  to  officers’  dependents.  At  large  activities  a mess  may  consist  of  dining  rooms;  snack  bars; cocktail lounges; lounge areas; rooms for private parties; and in some cases swimming pools, golf courses,  and  tennis  courts. ASSISTANCE   PROGRAMS To  promote  and  preserve  peace  of  mind  for its officers and their dependents, the Navy offers a  number  of  special  assistance  programs,  some of  which  have  substantial  cash  value. Family  Services  Centers At many Navy shore installations in the United States,  particularly  in  areas  of  fleet  concentration, Family Services Centers are established to assist new arrivals in obtaining personal services they may need. The  centers  ensure  newcomers  to  the  area receive a personal welcome, either by a home call or at the center. The new arrival is usually issued a brochure that includes information such as the following: 1.  A  map  of  the  area 2.  A  letter  of  welcome 3.  An  area  directory 4.  A  base  information  guide 5.  Data  on  available  medical  care,  Navy Relief, Red Cross, churches, commissaries and exchanges, educational facilities, base facilities,  and  so  on In  addition,  centers  will  refer  members  and their dependents to the proper facility to obtain needed  information  on,  among  other  things, passport  applications,  voting,  insurance,  career counseling, base and off-base housing, and finan- cial assistance. They may provide hospitality kits containing  necessary  items  of  household  items new  arrivals  can  borrow  until  their  household goods  are  delivered. For  the  benefit  of  attached  personnel  receiving orders,  centers  maintain  an  inventory  of  brochures containing  information  on  many  overseas  and continental  United  States  Navy  installations. Legal Assistance Personnel  may  obtain  confidential  guidance, without  cost,  from  legal  assistance  officers  at  most duty  stations.  Advice  rendered  generally  is  on legal,  personal,  and  property  problems,  or  the drafting of legal documents. Assistance does not include  representation  in  civil  court. Casualty Assistance Calls Program If  a  Navy  person  dies  on  active  duty,  the family  is  visited  promptly  by  a  casualty  assistance calls   officer   (CACO).   The   CACO   offers   the dependents  help  in  obtaining  rights,  benefits,  and privileges to which they are entitled and advises on  funeral  arrangements  and  financial  assistance, if  needed.  The  visit  by  the  CACO  is  automatic; the deceased’s family need not initiate the action. Navy Relief Society Known  as  the  “Navy’s  own  organization  to take  care  of  its  own,”  the  Navy  Relief  Society is   privately   supported,   primarily   by   means of  annual  requests  for  contributions.  At  the service   of   Navy   and   Marine   personnel   and dependents  who  need  emergency  help,  it  limits itself,   generally,   to   nonrecurring   situations   of distress  involving  clothing,  medical  care,  burial, and  the  like.  It  cannot  underwrite  permanent need. The society may make interest-free loans, outright  grants,  or  a  combination  of  the  two. Navy Mutual Aid Association The aim of the nonprofit Mutual Aid Associa- tion   is   to   provide   life   insurance   at   cost   and immediate aid to dependents of deceased officers. Upon  notice  of  a  member’s  death,  this  associa- tion wires or cables a $2,000 cash payment to the dependents of the deceased member anywhere in the  world.  The  total  life  insurance  coverage  is $400,000  available  in  $20,000  increments  to association members. Membership is available to 3-19

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