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Naval Orientation - Military manual for administrative purposes
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General Relations Between Juniors and Seniors
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. CHAPTER  7 MILITARY  COURTESY LEARNING  OBJECTIVES Upon  completion  of  this  chapter,  you  should  be  able  to  do  the  following: Identify  the  normal  courtesies  juniors  render      6. to  seniors. 7. Identify  the  basic  rules  of  conduct  for  ship- board   officers. 8. Describe  the  basic  guidelines  for  officers’      9. relationships  with  enlisted  personnel. Identify  the  proper  forms  of  address  for      10. military  personnel  to  both  military  and  civilian persons. 11. Describe  the  proper  procedures  for  boarding      12. ships and boats. Identify the rules for quarterdeck etiquette. Describe  the  organization  and  rules  of etiquette  for  the  wardroom  mess. Identify  the  rules  of  boat  etiquette. Describe   the   conduct   expected   of   naval personnel  in  foreign  countries. Describe  the  origin  of  the  hand  salute. Identify  the  proper  method  of  saluting. Identify  the  times  when  saluting  is  appro- priate  and  inappropriate. The essential traits of a naval officer are tact, loyalty,  integrity,  tolerance,  dependability,  good manners,  self-confidence,  a  sense  of  humor, regard for the rights of others, and the ability to treat everyone as equals. In  a  letter  to  Congress  in  1775,  John  Paul Jones  wrote,   “It  is  by  no  means  enough  that an  officer  of  the  Navy  should  be  a  capable mariner.  He  must  be  that,  of  course,  but  also  a great deal more. He should be as well a gentleman of   liberal   education   and   refined   manners, punctilious   courtesy,   and   the   nicest   sense   of personal   honor.” This  chapter  introduces  most  of  the  main aspects   of   military   courtesy   and   etiquette.   It covers the traditional elements that still survive and those which have changed with the passage of  time. NAVAL   ETIQUETTE Military  courtesy  between  officers  and  enlisted personnel  undergoes  little  change  during  wartime. These relations are the most fundamental part of all military courtesy and the main source of most naval etiquette. The   twin   foundations   of   military   courtesy among  officers  are  precedence  and  deference  to seniors.  Officers  take  precedence  according  to their  grade.  This  precedence  is  not  confined strictly to military relationships on ship or shore, but extends to the mess, to the club, and to social life. Naval courtesy prescribes that junior officers accord their seniors certain respect. This respect corresponds to that which younger people accord to their elders in a polite society. It also prescribes that  seniors  acknowledge  and  respond,  with  equal care,  to  these  tokens  of  respect  required  of 7-1

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