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Surface-Launched Antiair Warfare (AAW) Missiles
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Tomahawk
Characteristics of the SM-2(ER) missiles: Length: 26 feet, 2 inches Diameter: 13.5 inches Wing span: 5 feet, 2 inches Weight: 2,980 pounds Range: More than 30 nautical miles SPARROW The   AIM/RIM-74   is   a   much-improved   and highly    successful    air-to-air    and    surface-to-air version of the Sparrow missile. It has considerably greater    invulnerability    to    electronic    counter- measures    (ECM)    and    better    target-tracking capability.   The   fifth   operational   missile   of   the Sparrow   family,   it   can   be   employed   against attacking   aircraft   at   all   tactical   speeds   and altitudes in all weather. With   folding   wings   and clipped  tail  fins,  it  is  compatible  with  the  North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) Sea Sparrow launcher. Entering the  Navy’s  inventory  in  1983, this latest version of the Sparrow family continues to  be  one  of  the  Navy’s  most  heavily  procured missiles. Characteristics of the Sparrow: Length: 12 feet Diameter: 8 inches Wing span: 3 feet, 4 inches Weight: 510 pounds Speed: More than 2,660 miles per hour Range: More than 30 nautical miles CRUISE MISSILES Since  World  War  II  the  U.S.  Navy  has  relied upon   carrier   aircraft   to   maintain   sea   control. Other  navies,  not  having  the  money  for  carriers, developed  antiship  missiles.  These  missiles  were first used successfully by the Egyptians to sink the Israeli destroyer Elath in 1967. The battle opened a  new  era  in  naval  warfare.  Any  nation  with  a relatively  modest   investment   could   successfully challenge    the    most    powerful    naval    forces. The United States did not start development of a  similar  weapon  until  1971.  At  that  time  the United States realized our  Navy did not have the benefit of an equal weapon against ships equipped with antiship missiles. This led to the development of  the  Harpoon  cruise  missile.  Further  research eventually    led    to    the    development    of    the Tomahawk cruise missile. HARPOON The  Harpoon  (fig.  20-3)  is  a  medium-range, rocket-boosted, turbo-sustained, antiship cruise 134.53 Figure 20-3.-Harpoon missile being launched from a canister launcher aboard USS Leahy (CG-16). 20-5

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