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David Farragut
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Naval Orientation - Military manual for administrative purposes
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Spanish-American War
he   left   us   a   reminder   that   major   plans   are composed of minor details. Even a detail as minute as  water  buckets  received  Farragut’s  attention. Shortly  after  the  battle  of  Mobile  Bay,  Congress created   the   rank   of   admiral,   thereby   making Farragut  the  first  U.S.  Navy  admiral  in  July  of 1866. DAVID D. PORTER David  D.  Porter  (fig.  2-10)  was  the  son  of  the famous  David  Porter  who  commanded  the  Essex during the War of 1812. David D. Porter saw more continuous   fighting   than   any   American   naval officer of note during the Civil War—much of it on the Mississippi River. Competent, aggressive, and resourceful,    Porter    rose    from    the    rank    of lieutenant at the beginning of the conflict to rear admiral at its close. Through Porter’s urging,  the Navy  chose  Farragut  to  lead  the  New  Orleans expedition. 134.128 Figure 2-10.-Rear Admiral David D. Porter was the second admiral in the U.S. Navy, preceded only by Farragut. Porter commanded the Mississippi River flotilla in its  campaign down the big waterway that climaxed at Vicksburg.   Later  he inflicted a  brilliant  and  crushing defeat onthe confederates at Fort Fisher in 1865. Porter  devised  and  led  the  famous  mortar  flotilla that did much to crack the Delta defenses. Juniors were eager to serve under the dynamic Porter.  Besides   being   a   fine   seaman   and   able administrator,  he  possessed  many  personal  traits that  contributed  to  the  spectacular  success  of  his naval  career.  He  was  impulsive,  frank,  honest, and   endowed   with   a   creative   imagination.   He detested disloyalty and valued performance above protocol.  His  sense  of  humor  was  unquenchable; no  matter  how  desperate  a  situation  became,  he could  find  an  opportunity  for  a  jest.  He  could accurately estimate the potential of his subordinates and always praised them when they lived up to his expectations. Above all, he favored innovation and was open-minded toward anything that might be better. His progressive outlook kept him a step ahead of his colleagues. RAPHAEL SEMMES The   distinguished   Confederate   naval   leader Raphael Semmes (fig. 2-11) conveyed an 134.129 Figure 2-11. -Raphael Semmes, while skipper of the Confederate Alabama, ruthlessly burned ship after ship, virtually driving merchantmen flying the Stars and Stripes off the  seas. 2-13

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