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Importance of Sea Power -Continued
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Naval Orientation - Military manual for administrative purposes
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Strategic  Deterrence
Four  U.S.  territories  (Puerto  Rico,  the Virgin Islands, Guam, and the northern Marianas) lie overseas. We have formal alliances with 42 nations, 40  of  which  lie  overseas  and  two  (Canada  and Mexico)  that  border  the  United  States. Our principal allies (NATO and Japan) are highly  dependent  on  United  States  support  and imports,  the  bulk  of  which  must  be  transported by sea. Ninety-nine   percent   of   United   States’ overseas  trade  is  transported  by  sea  lanes  of communication  (world  trade  routes). U.S.  industrial  output  depends  on  con- tinued  shipments  of  raw  materials  and  energy- producing  resources  from  overseas. Our ability to control the sea is essential in the deterrence of general war and aggression against any nation or area vital to our interest. SEA  POWER  IN  SUPPORT  OF OUR  NATIONAL  OBJECTIVES One  of  the  greatest  concerns  of  those  in  the naval service is the Navy’s mission, function, and role  involving  sea  power  in  support  of  the  national objective of the United States. The younger sailor often asks questions such as Why are we getting underway?  What  is  the  purpose  of  this  deploy- ment? Why are we operating on the other side of the  world? To  understand  the  answers  to  these  questions, you  need  a  good  understanding  of  the  Navy’s mission.  You  also  need  to  understand  the functions and roles the Navy plays in support of this  mission. MISSION  OF  THE  NAVY The  mission  of  the  U.S.  Navy  is  set  forth  in Title 10 of the U.S. Code. It states that the U.S. Navy  must  be  prepared  to  conduct  prompt  and sustained  combat  operations  in  support  of  the national  interest.  This  means  the  Navy  must assure  continued  maritime  superiority  for  the United  States.  The  U.S.  Navy  must  be  able  to totally defeat any threats to the continued free use of the high seas by the United States. The Navy assures  continued  maritime  superiority  through the destruction of hostile aircraft, surface ships, and submarines that threaten seaborne forces of the United States and our allies. This mission is carried out within the framework of the national strategy,  in  joint  coordination  with  the  other services,  and  in  combined  planning  with  U.S. allies. To  fully  understand  the  Navy’s  mission,  you should  be  familiar  with  the  following  terms: NATIONAL  STRATEGY—National strategy  is  that  broad  course  of  action designed to achieve national objectives in support  of  national  interests.  The  United States  maintains  defense  forces  to  preserve its physical security and protect its political independence.  The  ability  of  the  defense forces to satisfy this objective depends on their  capacity  to  deter  aggression  and  to prevent coercion. It also depends on their capacity to exercise a degree of influence to  shape  world  events  in  a  manner  con- ducive  to  U.S.  interests. NATIONAL   OBJECTIVES—National objectives  are  specific  goals  our  nation seeks   to   advance,   support,   or   protect identified  national  interests.  These  goals can be categorized as political or economic objectives  or  as  objectives  of  security. NATIONAL   INTERESTS—National interests  are  generalized  conditions,  fre- quently  of  a  continuing  nature,  the  pursuit or  protection  of  which  is  perceived  to  be advantageous  to  the  nation.  They  range from  the  ultimate  interest,  national  sur- vival,  to  specific  regional  interests  that determine the importance of a region to the security  of  the  United  States. NAVAL  STRATEGY—Naval  strategy is the use of naval forces (including naval aviation  and  Marine  forces)  to  achieve naval  objectives  that  are  determined  by national   strategy. The   overall   naval- strategy objective is to control the sea and deny  an  enemy’s  use  of  the  sea  in  those areas  important  to  our  operations. FUNCTIONS  OF  THE  NAVY The  primary  functions  of  the  Navy  and  the Marine  Corps  are  to  organize,  train,  and  equip Navy and Marine Corps forces to conduct prompt 1-12

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