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Code of Conduct for Members of the Armed Forces of the United States -Continued
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Naval Orientation - Military manual for administrative purposes
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Summary - 12966_108
this  organization  to  function  openly,  so  it  will have to be established secretly. Good leadership and  discipline  are  keys  to  survival. ARTICLE  V When  questioned,  should  I  become  a prisoner  of  war,  I  am  required  to  give name,  rank,  service  number,  and  date  of birth.   I   will   evade   answering   further questions to the utmost of my ability. I will make no oral or written statements disloyal to my country and its allies or harmful to their cause. The  Geneva  Convention  requires  that  you give  your  name,  rate,  service  number,  and  date of  birth  when  questioned  by  the  enemy.  Any further  information,  although  seemingly  of  no importance,  could  be  of  value  to  the  enemy  in attempts to break your spirit or to be used against fellow  prisoners.  The  Geneva  Convention  also forbids physical and mental torture of prisoners. However,  since  the  Korean  conflict,  Communist forces   have   resorted   to   such   tactics   in   their attempts to gain information and to get prisoners to   collaborate. The time will come when you will have to say something  other  than  your  name,  rate,  service number,  and  date  of  birth,  if  only  to  avoid further questioning. Do not makeup stories. You may  fool  the  interrogator  for  a  short  time;  but eventually the enemy will find your stories to be false   and   may   resort   to   harsher   methods.   A simple   “I   don’t   know”   will   often   suffice. Oral or written confessions to  “war crimes,” surrender or peace appeals, and statements critical of  the  United  States  are  forbidden.  They  could pose  a  danger  to  you  and  your  fellow  prisoners and damage our country. Any confession becomes grounds  for  trying  a  prisoner  as  a  war  criminal if  the  enemy  so  desires. ARTICLE  VI I   will   never   forget   that   I   am   an American,  fighting  for  freedom,  respon- sible for my actions, and dedicated to the principles which made my country free. I will  trust  in  my  God  and  in  the  United States  of  America. In the event you are unable to avoid capture, remember the first sentence of the first article: “I am  an  American,  fighting  for  freedom.”  Those 5-13 seven words signify your faith and confidence in your  God,  your  country,  your  service,  and yourself. As  a  member  of  the  armed  forces  of  the United  States,  you  are  always  subject  to  the UCMJ,  even   as   a   prisoner   of   war.   After return  to  friendly  forces  or  escape,  you  will  be investigated  to  determine  the  circumstances of your capture and your conduct as a prisoner. If  you  have  done  your  utmost  to  uphold  the principles of this code, you need not worry about such  an  investigation.  You  may  even  be  able  to give  valuable  information  that  will  help  future prisoners. Many Americans have been prisoners of war, and they all agree that the life of a POW is a hard one.  A  few  of  those  POWs  were  either  unprepared to  resist  or  lacked  the  ability  to  maintain  their basic  faith  and  loyalty  under  extreme  pressure. These  Americans  succumbed  to  the  enemy’s efforts  and  acted  in  a  manner  detrimental  to  their country,   their   fellow   service   members,   and themselves. Remember, you will have to live the rest of your life remembering your conduct under stress. The majority of American prisoners have behaved honorably and with pride because they believed  in  and  adhered  to  the  principles  and strength  on  which  our  country  was  founded. NAVY  LEADER  DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM   (NAVLEAD) Through  research,  the  Navy  has  identified various   leadership   skills   to   distinguish   the differences  between  superior  performers  and average  performers  as  Navy  leaders.  These  skills, or  characteristics,  are  sometimes  referred  to  as competencies. The  Navy  offers  a  variety  of  1-week  Navy Leader   Development   Program   (NAVLEAD) courses designed to train students to apply these specific  leadership  skills  in  various  job  situations. The  NAVLEAD  courses  are  available  to  E-5 through O-6 personnel. All E-6 and E-7 personnel are  required  to  complete  an  NAVLEAD  course to  be  eligible  for  advancement  to  E-7  and  E-8. The  NAVLEAD  course  for  division  officers is  based  on  the  following  13  characteristics: 1. 2. TAKES  INITIATIVE:  Demonstrates  will- ingness  to  go  beyond  what  the  situation requires  and  to  act  before  being  asked. FOLLOWS  THROUGH:  Monitors  what people  and  the  organization  are  doing  to ensure quality and to maintain standards.

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