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Naval Orientation - Military manual for administrative purposes
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One or More of the Maximum Punishment Authorized by Article 15
ENFORCEMENT  OF  THE  UCMJ The UCMJ gives the rules and regulations that should govern our behavior. These rules, as with any rules, however, are not always obeyed. When these  rules  are  broken,  the  offender  must  be punished.  This  is  done  according  to  the  provisions of  article  15  (Commanding  officer’s  nonjudicial punishment)  or,  in  some  cases,  by  courts- martial. Nonjudicial Punishment Commanding  officer’s  nonjudicial  punish- ment  is  often  referred  to  as  captain’s  mast. Captain’s mast gets its name from the old sailing days  when  the  setting  for  this  form  of  naval justice  was  the  weather  deck  near  the  ship’s mainmast. Cases  are  heard  and  punishments  given  at captain’s  mast.  Anyone  who  is  not  attached  to or  embarked  in  a  vessel  may,  however,  demand trial  by  court-martial  in  lieu  of  punishment  at mast,  before  such  punishment  is  imposed.  Anyone attached to a vessel may not request trial by court- martial  in  lieu  of  captains’s  mast. The punishments permitted at captain’s mast depend upon the rank of the officer holding mast. Figure  6-2  shows  the  punishment  that  may  be awarded. A commanding officer who decides an offense deserves a punishment more severe than he or she is authorized to award at mast may order a court- martial. The following paragraphs explain some of the punishments   that   may   be   given   at   captain’s mast. RESTRICTION.  —Restriction  is  the  require- ment  to  remain  within  certain  specified  limits (ship,   station, etc.).   Although   required   to muster  at  certain  times,  the  restricted  person usually  continues  to  perform  his  or  her  regular duties. CORRECTIONAL   CUSTODY.   —Correc- tional custody is the physical restraint (confine- ment) of a person during duty or nonduty hours, or both. The person may be required to perform extra duties or hard labor. A typical example is an  individual  who  is  free  to  carry  out  regular duties during the day but is confined in the brig at night. CONFINEMENT ON BREAD AND WATER OR  DIMINISHED  RATIONS.  Confinement on bread and water or diminished rations may be imposed  only  on  enlisted  persons  aboard  ship. Correctional  custody  and  confinement  on  bread and water may be imposed only on enlisted per- sons  below  the  rank  of  petty  officer. EXTRA  DUTY.  —Extra  duty  is  the  assign- ment   of   any   duty   (except   guard   duty)   to   be performed   after   the   person’s   regular   working hours. Extra duty is not to exceed 2 hours daily or  to  be  performed  on  holidays.  Petty  officers may  not  be  assigned  extra  duties  that  would demean  their  grade  or  position. FORFEITURE OF PAY. —Forfeiture of pay is  a  permanent  loss  of  a  specified  amount  or  a temporary  withholding  of  a  certain  amount  of pay. The detention period must be specified. The money detained is normally returned at the end of the detention period, but it can be detained for a  period  of  1  year. DETENTION  OF  PAY.  —Detention  of  pay is the temporary withholding of a certain amount of  pay.  The  detention  period  must  be  specified. The money detained is normally returned at the end  of  the  detention  period,  but  it  can  be  detained for  a  period  of  1  year. APPEALS. —If  persons  consider  their  punish- ment  under  article  15  to  be  unjust  or  out  of proportion to the offense, they may appeal to the next superior authority in the chain of command. The appeal must be made within a reasonable time (generally  15  days)  and  promptly  forwarded.  If the  superior  authority  upholds  the  appeal,  all rights,  privileges,  and  property  are  restored. PROTECTION  AGAINST  SELF-INCRIMI- NATION.   —Under  article  31  of  the  UCMJ, compulsory  self-incrimination  is  prohibited.  The accused  must  be  informed  of  the  nature  of  the 6-26

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