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Training - 12966_92
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Naval Orientation - Military manual for administrative purposes
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Dog Watch
Handbook for Petty Officers, published  annually for  each  rating,  provides  an  excellent  source  of information  on  these  requirements. Watch Stations Almost every division of any command in the Navy   requires   personnel   to   stand   watches. Although  the  requirements  for  the  different watches   may   vary,   personnel   must   meet   the qualifications for each watch they stand. Division officers  must  provide  qualified  individuals  from their   division   to   meet   these   watch   require- ments. Before personnel can stand a watch, they must complete  the  PQS  for  that  watch.  The  PQS Program qualifies officer and enlisted personnel to perform portions of their assigned duties. This could  include  a  specific  watch  station,  such  as OOD  or  a  specific  job,  such  as  3-M  coordinator. Personnel  qualification  standards  are  a  written compilation of the knowledge and skills required for a specific watch station. Division officers have the responsibility of tracking the progress of their personnel   in   completing   the   PQS   required   of them.  Having  an  efficient  watch  team  requires having  personnel  who  are  properly  qualified  to stand the watches. Anything less is an invitation to disaster. SUMMARY While  being  a  naval  officer  may  not  be  one of the easiest jobs you have, it could well be the most  rewarding.  It  might  not  make  you  rich  or famous,  but  it  can  be  a  job  in  which  you  have great pride. Your  duties  as  a  naval  officer  are  immense; yet so is your authority. Use this authority wisely in  performing  your  duties.  Remember,  the  gold bars  you  wear  on  your  collar  don’t  make  you smarter; they only give you authority, Depend on your chiefs and petty officers for guidance; they have  the  experience  and  can  teach  you  much  if you  will  let  them. Think  back  on  chapter  1  for  a  moment.  Do you remember what the role of the U.S. Navy is according   to   Title   10   of   the   U.S.   Code?   The Navy’s role is to be ready to conduct prompt and sustained  combat  operations  in  support  of  the national interest. For the Navy to be able to fulfill this  role,  you,  as  a  naval  officer,  must  be  ready to  perform  your  military  duties.  Only  through self-examination,  study  of  your  job,  and  mature and  rational  performance  can  you  fulfill  your duties  and  responsibilities  as  a  naval  officer. REFERENCES Standard  Organization  and  Regulations  of  the U.S. Navy,  OPNAVINST  3120.32B,  Office  of the  Chief  of  Naval  Operations,  Washington, D.C.,   September,   1986. United  States  Navy  Regulations,  1990,  Depart- ment  of  the  Navy,  Office  of  the  Secretary, Washington,   D.C.,   1990. SUGGESTED  READING Lee,  D.M.,  J.M.  Brown,  R.  Morabito,  H.S. Dolenda,  Watch   Officer’s   Guide,   12th  ed., Naval Institute Press, Annapolis, Md., 1986. Mack,  W.P.  and  T.D.  Paulsen,   The  Naval Officer’s Guide, 9th ed., Naval Institute Press, Annapolis,   Md.,   1983. Noel,  J.V.,   Division  Officer’s  Guide,  8th  ed., Naval Institute Press, Annapolis, Md., 1986. U.S.  Department  of  Defense,  The  Armed  Forces Officer,   DOD   GEN-36A,   American   Forces Information   Services,   Washington,   D.C., 1988. 4-7

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