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Functional Organization
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Naval Orientation - Military manual for administrative purposes
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Summary - 12966_299
anticipated   danger.    Navy   ships   observe   the following  conditions  of  readiness: CONDITION  I—The  maximum  state  of readiness for battle, with the entire crew at  battle  stations  prepared  for  imminent action. This condition, also called general quarters (GQ), is often set for drills as well. CONDITION   IAS—A   variation   of CONDITION  I  designed  to  meet  the  threat of  submarine  attack. CONDITION    IE—Provides    temporary relaxation   of   CONDITION   I   to   enable personnel  to  rest  on  stations  and  to  permit designated  personnel  to  draw  and  distri- bute action meals at their action stations. CONDITION   II—A   special   watch applicable   to   gunfire   support   ships   for situations   such   as   extended   periods   of shore   bombardment. CONDITION   III—The   normal   wartime cruising condition when surprise attack is possible. Part of the armament is manned and  ready  for  immediate  action. CONDITION  IV—Provides  effective  ship and  aircraft  control  during  peacetime cruising. CONDITION V—Under this condition the ship is in port with no armament manned. WATCH,  QUARTER,  AND STATION  BILL Each   division   officer   is   responsible   for maintaining  a  watch,  quarter,  and  station  bill based on the ship’s battle bill and the  Standard Organization and Regulations of the U. S. Navy. The  watch,  quarter,  and  station  bill  shows  each person’s  name,  rate,  billet  number,  and  bunk number.  In  addition,  it  shows  each  person’s  battle station; watches during Conditions I, II, and III; station  or  duty  assignments  in  case  of  an emergency, such as fire or man overboard; at-sea and   in-port   watch   stations;   and   the   cleaning station. LOGS Each  ship  in  commission  maintains  a  ship’s deck log and an engineering log. Each ship also maintains an engineer’s bell book as an adjunct to  those  logs. Persons who keep the logs make no erasures in these records. Only those persons required to sign   the   record   for   the   watch   may   make corrections,  additions,  or  changes.  Persons  who keep  the  logs  make  changes  requested  by commanding officers only if the persons consider them   correct;   otherwise,   commanding   officers enter  over  the  persons’  signature  such  remarks  as they  deem  appropriate. Ship’s Deck Log The ship’s deck log is a complete daily record, by  watches.  It  contains  a  description  of  every circumstance  and  occurrence  of  importance  or interest  about  the  crew  and  the  operation  and safety of the ship. It also contains a description of  any  circumstance  or  occurrence  of  possible historical   value.   The   navigator   has   overall responsibility  for  preparation  and  care  of  the ship’s  deck  log.  The  type  of  information  noted in  the  log  includes  data  such  as  the  ship’s operating   orders;   its   courses,   speeds,   and positions; and the state of the sea and weather. It  also  includes  information  about  damage  or accidents to the ship or its cargo, deaths or injuries to personnel, and changes in the status of ship’s personnel  or  passengers.  The  log  also  contains records   of   meetings   or   adjourning   of   courts- martial  and  other  formal  boards.  The  log  contains reports of all routine inspections, which serves as a record of whether or not such inspections were made.   OPNAVINST   3100.7B   prescribes   the manner and form in which the navigator should prepare  the  log. The ship’s deck log serves as a chronological record of the events occurring during each watch. It  provides  necessary  information  to  the commanding  officer  and  ultimately  serves  as  a historical   document.   Accuracy   in   describing events recorded in a ship’s deck log is essential. Such   entries   often   constitute   important   legal evidence   in   judicial   and   administrative   fact- finding  proceedings  arising  from  incidents involving  the  ship  or  its  personnel. Engineering Log The  engineering  log  is  a  daily  record,  by watches, of important events and data about the engineering department and the operation of the ship’s propulsion plant. The Commander, Naval Sea  Systems  Command,  prescribes  the  manner and  form  of  preparation  of  the  log. 16-6

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