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Maritime Bouyage System
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Lateral  Marks
Figure 5-19.–IALA Maritime Buoyage System, Buoyage Regions A and B. 4. Safe water marks–used to indicate that there is water  safe  for  navigation  all  around  the  position (examples:  midchannel  and  fairways). 5.  Special  marks–call  attention  to  an  area  or specific feature. Explanation of special marks may be found on the navigational chart you are using, in Sailing Directions, or in Coast Pilots. Distinguishing   Marks The meaning of the mark depends upon one or more of  the  following  features: 1. By day–color, shape, and topmark 2.   By  night–light  color  and  phase  characteristics COLOR.— The colors used for lateral marks in Region A are red, green, green with one red horizontal band, and red with one green horizontal band. The colors used for lateral marks in Region B are green, red, red with one green horizontal band, and green  with  one  red  horizontal  band. SHAPE.— There are five basic buoy shapes (fig. 5-20): can, nun, spherical, pillar, and spar. With the exception of pillar and spar buoys, the shape of the buoy indicates the correct side on which to pass. Can buoys may sometimes be referred to as cylindrical, and nun buoys referred to as conical. The term pillar is used to describe any buoy that is smaller than a lighthouse buoy Figure 5-20.–Basic buoy shapes. but has a tall, central structure on a broad base. Lighted buoys in the United States are referred to as pillar buoys. TOPMARKS.— The IALA Maritime Buoyage System makes use of can, nun, spherical, and X-shaped topmarks only. Topmarks on pillar and spar buoys are particularly important to indicate the side on which they will  be  passed  and  will  be  used  wherever  practical. LIGHTS.— Where marks are lighted, red and green lights are reserved for port and starboard or starboard 5-27

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