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Boat Crew Duties
Figure 5-6.–33-foot utility boat. STANDARD  BOAT  EQUIPMENT LEARNING OBJECTIVES: List the standard boat   equipment.   Explain   the   upkeep, maintenance and care of small boat equipment. Every Navy boat in active service is required to have a complete outfit of equipment as designated by the Naval  Sea  Systems  Command  (NAVSEASYSCOM), Naval  Ships'  Technical  Manual,  Chapter  583,  “Boats and  Small  Craft”,  OPNAVINST  3120.32  B  and applicable   publications. The   Coordinated   Shipboard   Allowance   List (COSAL) lists all the items required with the boat on the ship (items furnished with the boat) and the items that must  be  requisitioned.  The  equipment  furnished  with each boat, called portable parts, generally consists of the following  items: Anchor,  30-pound  LWT  (lightweight) Bucket Life rings, 24-inch Fenders Grapnel, No. 4 with 6 feet of 1/4-inch close-link chain Boat hook, 8-foot Line, anchor, 25 fathoms of 2 1/4-inch line Line, grapnel, 15 fathoms of 21-thread line Bow, painter, 5 fathoms of 3-inch line Stern fast, 5 fathoms of 3-inch line Fire extinguisher, 15-pound CO2 portable type UPKEEP  AND  MAINTENANCE During active service, every effort should be made to  provide  thorough  ventilation  and  drainage  and  to prevent water leakage. Standing water and oil in the bilges, even in small amounts, is hazardous; therefore, seams  must  be  carefully  caulked  and  maintained watertight. In fair weather, hatches and deck plates of boats afloat should be opened to increase air circulation. Wet dunnage, line, and life jackets in lockers should be removed and aired out. Boat crews should be alert for leaks  beneath  the  covering  board  and  deckhouse  area. 5-5

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