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Chapter 11 Field Kitchens
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Mess Management Specialist 3 & 2 - Military manual for maintaining a mess hall
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Planning the Kitchen Layout - 14164_245
P-5010. This chapter discusses in detail the following: water  supplies,  sources  of  water,  water  analysis, standards and purification of water, and the  Standard organization   and   Regulations   of   the   U.S.   Navy, OPNAVINST 3120.32, in case medical personnel are not available. Remember that none of the methods of disinfecting  water  contained  in  these  publications destroys radioactive substances or chemical poisons. GROUNDWATER.—  Groundwater  from  springs or wells is usually better than surface water. When you use water from a ground source, be sure it is a safe 100 feet  or  more  from  sources  of  contamination.  Some sources  of  contamination  are  heads,  septic  tanks,  and cesspools.  In  limestone  ground  formations,  the  distance may need to be much greater. Wells and springs should be   constructed   to   exclude   surface   water   and high-groundwater infiltration. Well and spring sites should not be subject to flooding. SURFACE WATER.— Surface water is water from rivers, lakes, streams, and ponds. When you must use water from a surface source, take it from a point well above and away from sewer outlets. Avoid places where refuse drains into a river, stream, or lake, and oily areas where  wastes  and  drainage  may  make  the  water unpalatable or unfit for use. Always choose the clearest water possible; the clearer the water, the easier it is to disinfect   and   the   better   its   appearance   will   be. Clearness,  however,  is  no  guarantee  of  safety.  All surface water must be treated. Clean water receptacles daily with boiling water and rinse  with  a  solution  of  potassium  permanganate (one-third  of  a  teaspoonful  of  potassium  permanganate Figure 11-2.—Rear area layout for field feeding. 11-2

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