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Figure  8-3.—Ear-protective  devices. Exhaust Area Hazards Jet  engine  exhaust  creates  several  hazards.  Tests show that while the carbon monoxide content of jet exhaust is low, other gases are present that are imitating to the eyes. Less noticeable, but as important, is the respiratory irritation exhaust fumes may cause. The  two  most  important  hazards  of  jet  engine exhaust are the high temperature and high velocity of the exhaust gases from the tail pipe. You can find high temperatures  up  to  several  hundred  feet  from  the  tail pipe,  depending  on  wind  conditions.  Closer  to  the aircraft,  temperatures  are  high  enough  to  damage asphalt  pavement. When  a  jet  engine  is  started,  excess  fuel accumulates in the tail pipe. When the fuel ignites, long flames  can  be  blown  out  the  tail  pipe.  Flight  line personnel  should  know  the  possibility  of  this  hazard. They should keep all flammable materials clear of the danger  area. During maximum power settings, the high velocity of the exhaust gases may pick up and blow loose dirt, sizable rocks, sand, and debris several hundred feet. that creates an eye and FOD hazard. Therefore, you should use caution when parking an aircraft for run-up. The  general  information  section  of  the  applicable maintenance   instruction   manual   (MIM)   contains information   about   exhaust   area   hazards.   These instructions should be strictly adhered to. NO ONE SHOULD   FOOLISHLY   EXPERIMENT   WITH THE SPECIFIED SAFETY MARGINS. After engine operation, no work should be done to the  exhaust  section  for  at  LEAST  ONE-HALF  HOUR (preferably longer). If work is required immediately, personnel  must  wear  heat-resistant  gloves. Engine Noise Jet  engines  produce  noise  capable  of  causing temporary as well as permanent loss of high-frequency hearing. On the flight line, noise levels can exceed 150 decibels  (dB).  When  working  around  jet  engines,  you should  take  the  following  precautions  to  protect  your hearing: Report  on  time  for  your  annual  or  periodic audiograms. Do  not  exceed  the  directed  time  limits  on exposure to the various sound intensities. Wear the proper ear protection, such as earplugs or sound attenuators (fig. 8-3). If double hearing protection is specified, wear earplugs under your cranial earmuffs. 8-14

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