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Figure 4-3.—Sketch of mishap scene
Figure 4-2.—Investigation photograph with ruler to show scale. different light, exposures, or angle; but only print the good shots. Photographs are physical evidence. They can be shared among investigators. The  only  exception  is  if the  mishap  investigation  board  deliberately  stages  a photograph.  Based  on  its  deliberations,  the  board may want a photograph staged to prove or disprove a point.  For  example,  the  board  may  decide  that  a worker  was  electrocuted  by  touching  a  light  switch over   a   metal   sink.   To   prove   that   could   have happened, the board may have a worker of the same height  stand  in  the   same   spot   to   try   to   reenact touching the switch. Staging the photograph to show that  the  victim  could  reach  the  switch  makes  that photograph  and  its  negative  privileged  information. Also,  if  a  mishap  board  member  writes  or  draws something    on    a    photograph    based    on    board deliberations, the photograph then becomes privileged. The negative to that photograph, without the writing, is not privileged. When taking photographs for your investigation, keep the following tips in mind: · Take a few shots while  approaching  the  mishap. Follow the path of travel of the victim. · Photograph   anything   that   may   get   moved   or collected. · If you get there while the mishap is in progress, take   photos   of   the   onlookers   and   emergency response  personnel.  That  may  provide  identifi- cation of witnesses to the mishap and where they were standing. · Get photos from all sides, if possible. · Photograph   the   debris   so   that   you   can   see details—get  close  but  keep  some  background  in the   photo   to   show   a   relationship   with   other evidence. · Show  a  scale  of  the  item  by  photographing  a person, a hand, a ruler, or a clipboard next to the item (fig. 4-2). 4-9

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