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Figure 4-2.—Investigation photograph with ruler to show scale
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Naval Safety Supervisor - Military manual on safety practices
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Using Various Types of Witnesses
Figure 4-3.—Sketch of mishap scene. Use a pen or pencil to draw arrows to parts of the photograph  you  wish  to  draw  attention  to. Take wide-angle shots as well as close-ups. Identify your photo by including a photo log, slate, or card in the photo with a code or number or some other method of identification. Label each photo according to your log or record, telling when it was taken, who took it, under what conditions it was taken, where it was taken from, and what it shows. Otherwise, you may end up with a photo of a jumble of wires and twisted metal with no clue as to what the photo is of. It is embarrassing to leaf through a stack of photographs and not even know which angle is up! VIDEOTAPING.—   Videotaping  is  a  valuable method of recording a mishap scene, but it is not a substitute for still photography. A video tape shows responders in action and shows movement and color; but it cannot be studied as well as a photo. Recording a reenactment of the chain of events leading to a mishap can serve as a valuable supplement to still photography. A videotape made by an afloat or aviation mishap investigation board to reenact a mishap is  privileged,  since  the  tape  reflects  the  board’s deliberations. passersby,  or Other video tapes made by reporters, a  single  investigator  are  not  privileged since they are physical evidence. SKETCHING,  DIAGRAMING,  AND  CHAR- TING.— A sketch is a drawing made at a mishap site. It is  usually  a  rough,  stylized  drawing  that  can  be smoothed up later into a more accurate diagram. Charts are usually tables of information, measurements, or statistics  used  to  clarify  certain  points.  You  may  also have  charts  of  speeds,  instrument  readings,  and temperatures. The  same  rules  that  apply  to  the  labeling  of photographs  apply  to  the  labeling  of  sketches  and diagrams  (fig.  4-3).  Carefully  label  sketches  and diagrams  as  you  would  a  photograph.  The  advantage that a diagram has over a photograph is that it is less cluttered. A diagram can show movement with arrows, angles, positions of people and parts, and key distances. Drawn closely to scale, it can emphasize certain aspects of a photograph to clarify a point. Sketches may be the only  evidence  you  have  from  a  mishap  scene  if photographs were not available before evidence was moved. With a sketch or diagram, you can add information like  temperatures,  air  flow,  plots  of  noise,  and  lighting. 4-10

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