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Figure 5-2.—Heat  stress  monitor. Heat stress can occur when personnel are wearing layered,  impermeable,  or  impervious  clothing  such  as fire-fighting;  chemical,  biological,  and  radiological (CBR);  or  hazardous  material  protective  clothing.  The presence   of   atmospheric   contaminants   such   as combustion gases or fuel vapors may also contribute to heat stress. Heavy exertion, such as that involved in athletics, in hot, humid weather also leads to heat stress. Other conditions that lead to heat stress include reduced physical stamina because of illness; lack of sleep; or the use of medication, drugs, or alcohol. Heat stress ashore is of concern when personnel are required to work or drill in hot weather. Many bases raise  colored  flags  to  indicate  the  level  of  caution required because of the heat. Preventing Heat Stress You can prevent heat stress injury as follows: 1.  By  detecting,  correcting,  and  controlling  the conditions that cause heat stress 2. 3. 4. By using dry bulb thermometers to monitor locations  in  which  heat  stress  conditions  maybe present By  restricting  personnel  exposure  to  heat  stress conditions  as  the  result  of  heat  stress  surveys conducted  to  determine  safe  stay  times By recognizing heat stress symptoms in yourself or  in  shipmates  and  acting  to  prevent  or minimize the effects of heat injury Since dry bulb temperature, humidity, and radiant heat all affect the body and may cause heat stress, you must take all three into account. Conducting a heat stress survey with a wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT) meter  (fig.  5-2)  provides  a  calculated  WBGT  index.  You can use this index with a graph of physiological heat exposure limits (PHEL) curves to determine stay times in that environment. Since we cannot reduce the heat, we must reduce the exposure time of the personnel working in that heat. Stay times also take into account the  work  load  of  the  individual. You can find further information and guidance on the Navy Heat Stress Control and Prevention Program in  OPNAVINST  5100.20C,  Shipboard  Heat  Stress Control   and   Personnel   Protection;   OPNAVINST 5-6

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