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Rules of the Road - 14220_136
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Steering and Sailing Rules, Continued - 14220_138
Steering and Sailing Rules Information In  this  portion  of  the  chapter  a  short  discussion  of  the  steering  and sailing  rules  will  be  presented,  but  the  majority  of  our  discussion  will  be about  part  D,  which  contains  the  requirements  for  sound  signals. You  must  understand  the  steering  and  sailing  rules  and  be  able  to  apply them  to  various  traffic  situations.  Although  all  rules  of  the  road  are important,  the  steering  and  sailing  rules  are  the  most  essential  to  know to  avoid  collision.  The  risk  of  collision  can  be  considered  to  exist  if  the bearing  of  an  approaching  vessel  does  not  change  appreciably. NOTE:    When  you  are  approaching  a  very  large  vessel,  or  when  you  are in  close  quarters,  a  bearing  change  alone  does  not  necessarily  mean  that a  collision  cannot  happen. Figures  4-18,  4-19,  and  4-20  illustrate  the  three  situations  in  which  the danger  of  collision  might  exist:  head-on,  crossing,  and  overtaking.  The illustrations  and  the  following  summary  will  help  you  learn  the  rules  and the  appropriate  actions  to  take. Head On When  two  ships  meet head  on,  or  nearly  so (fig.  4-18),  each  ship must  change  course  to starboard  and  pass port-to-port.   In international  waters,  a whistle  signal  is sounded  only  when  a course  change  is actually  made.  If  the meeting  ships  are already  far  enough  off each  other  to  pass  clear on  their  present  courses, no  signal  is  sounded. Figure  4-18.  Ships  in  a  head  on  situation. 4-39

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