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Origins and Primary Areas of Navigation, Continued - 14220_21
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Quartermaster 1 & C - Military manual for the Quartermaster rate
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Problems Associated with Navigation, Continued - 14220_23
Problems Associated with Navigation Information As  you  have  learned,  navigation  is  an  art  and  a  science.  Our  early navigators  experienced  the  same  problems  that  face  the  modem navigators. There  are  three  major  problems  of  navigation  that  must always  be  addressed.  These  problems  are: How  to  determine  position How  to  determine  the  direction  to  get  from  point  A  to  point  B How  to  determine  the  distance  between  points,  the  time  it  will take,  and  the  speed  as  the  navigator  proceeds Determining Position Of  the  three  problems  facing  the  navigator,  the  most  basic  and  also  the most  important  is  determining  position.  The  ship’s  position  must  be known  to  safely  and  accurately  direct  the  movements  of  the  ship. The  term  position  refers  to  a  known  point  on  Earth.  QMs  refer  to  a position  as  a  fix.  It  may  also  be  qualified  by  an  adjective  such  as estimated  and  dead reckoned. Measuring Direction Direction  is  the  orientation  of  a  line  drawn  or  imagined  joining  two positions  without  any  regard  to  the  distance  between  them.  Direction  on charts  is  measured  in  angular  units  using  a  polar  coordinate  system  (a coordinate  system  based  on  the  North  Pole  and  South  Pole).  The reference  used  is  normally  true  north. Figure 1-3 shows a line drawn  between two positions. The  direction may be determined from  the compass  rose. Direction  is measured  from 000° T through 360° T. Figure  1-3.  Compass  rose. 1-6

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