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Special Material Identification Code
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Storekeeper 3 & 2 - Manual for watching over inventory and other things needed in a store
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Terms, Continued
TERMS It is important to have a clear understanding of the terms  used  in  the  material  identification  process.  The following terms are used in this process: MATERIAL—refers   to   supplies,   repair   parts, equipment,  and  equipage  used  in  the  Navy. EQUIPMENT—any   functional   unit   of   hull, mechanical,  electrical,  ordnance,  or  electronic-type material, It operated by itself or as a component of a system  or  subsystem.  Equipment  is  identified  by  a component  identification  number  (CID),  numerical control  code  (NCC),  allowance  parts  list  (APL),  or similar  designation. SUPPORT EQUIPMENT—is equipment such as test  equipment,  fixtures,  hand  tools,  etc.,  required  for the  maintenance,  assembly,  disassembly,  overhaul, repair, and test or check of an end item of equipment. EQUIPMENT  DIVISION—The  standard  terms that describe the breakdown of electrical, electronic, mechanical,   pneumatic,   and   hydraulic   military equipment.  They  are  explained  as  follows Part—one   or   more   pieces   joined   together. Normally,  disassembly  prevents  them  from being  used  as  designed  (e.g.,  outer  front  wheel bearing  of  a  truck,  an  electron  tube,  a composition   resistor). Subassembly—is two or more parts which form a portion of an assembly or a unit that can be replaced as a whole. It may have a part or parts that  can  be  individual  y  replaced  (e.g.,  gun mount stand, window sash, recoil mechanism, floating piston, telephone dial, terminal bead with  mounted  parts). Assembly—a number of parts, subassemblies or  any  combination,  joined  together  to  perform a specific function (e.g., power shovel front, fan assembly,   audiofrequency   amplifier).   The distinction   between   an   assembly   and   a subassembly  is  not  always  exact.  An  assembly in one instance maybe a subassembly in another (i.e., when it forms a portion of an assembly). Unit—an assembly or any combination of parts, subassemblies,    and    assemblies    mounted together,   normally   capable   of   independent operation   in   a   variety   of   situations   (e.g., hydraulic  jack,  electric  motor,  electronic  power supply,  internal  combustion  engine,  electric generator, radio receiver). The size of an item is a  consideration  in  some  cases.  An  electric  motor for a clock may be considered as a unit, because it  is  not  normally  disassembled. Group—a  collection  of  units,  assemblies,  or subassemblies which is a subdivision of a set or system.   It   is   not   capable   of   performing   a complete  operational  function  (e.g.,  antenna group,  indicator  group). EQUIPAGE—items which require management control  afloat  because  of  one  or  more  of  the  following factors: High unit cost Vulnerability to pilferage Essential to the ship’s mission Equipage does not include installed mechanical, electrical,   ordnance,   or   electronic   equipments, components, or systems. Equipage items are usually identifiable to an end-use application aboard a ship. Allowed quantities of the item are determined on an individual  ship  basis.  Chargeable  items  of  equipage  are identified in procurement, receipt, and consumption documents by the letter “E” in the second position of the  applicable  fund  code.  (See  NAVSO  P-3013.) Controlled   Equipage—to   those   items   of equipage  that  require  special  management control  because  the  material  is: essential for the protection of life, or relatively  valuable  and  easily  convertible  to personal  use. Controlled  equipage  (e.g.,  life  preservers,  gas masks, binoculars, and firearms) is usually carried on board  in  allowance  quantities  only,  and  require  special inventory  control  in  accordance  with  NAVSUP  P-485. Equipment  and  Equipage  Replacements  Funded by   a   Type   Commander   as   Controlled Equipage—durable,  high  priced,  and  essential items  of  equipment  and  equipage  not  designated as  controlled  equipage.  These  are  normally replaced  during  a  ship’s  regular  overhaul  only. Replacement of such items as anchors, shots of chain, chain stoppers, binnacles, pelorus, and laundry  equipment  during  a  regular  overhaul, are chargeable to overhaul funds. If replacement of  these  items  is  required  between  overhauls  an OPTAR augmentation is normally requested from the type commander. REPAIR PART—any item, including modules and consumable-type  materials,  which  has  an  equipment 4-4

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