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Speech Improvement - 14300_51
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Figure  5-2.-Body  movement  and  gestures  to  avoid.
talking   to   the   chalkboard   or   visual   aid   panel   or   to   any   other   training   aid   you   may   be   using. Maintaining  effective  eye  contact  enhances  your  credibility.  Another  important  reason  for looking  directly  at  your  students  is  to  observe  their  nonverbal  reactions  to  your  instruction. Feedback  provides  you  with  the  opportunity  to  judge  your  effectiveness  and  make  necessary adjustments   as   discussed   later   in   this   chapter. BODY    MOVEMENT Body   movement   is   an   important   part   of   successful   communication;   it   reinforces,   emphasizes, and   clarifies   verbally   expressed   ideas. Because  body  movement  is  so  easily  adaptable  for communicating,   skilled   pantomimic   actors   can   tell   complicated   stones   involving   many   characters through  physical  movement  alone. However,   your   actions   while   instructing   must   reinforce rather  than  contradict  your  words.  Make  sure  the  image  you  present  and  your  body  movements strengthen  your  communication. Movement  is  the  motion  of  the  whole  body  as  you  travel  about  the  classroom.  Movement attracts   the   attention   of   the   listener   because   the   eye   instinctively   follows   moving   objects   and focuses   on   them.   Movement   can   help   you   convey   thoughts   to   your   audience. The  basic  rule  in  movement  is  moderation.  Do  not  remain  glued  to  one  spot,  but  do  not  keep on  the  move  all  the  time.  As  your  skill  and  experience  increase,  your  movement  will  become less  obvious  and  more  meaningful.  Learn  to  modify  the  degree  of  movement  to  make  it  natural and   meaningful. Plan   your   movement   so   that   you   are   at   the   proper   place   at   the   proper   time.   For   example, when  using  an  overhead  projector  with  a  transparency,  plan  movement  so  that  you  are  at  the machine  when  it  should  be  turned  on;  when  you  need  to  open  the  curtains,  plan  movement  so that  you  are  at  the  curtain  control  point  at  the  time  the  curtain  should  be  opened. GESTURES A  gesture  is  a  natural  movement  of  any  part  of  the  body  that  conveys  a  thought  or  emotion or   reinforces   oral   expression.   Your   arms,   hands,   and   facial   expressions   are   your   principal   tools of  gesture.  Your  gestures  will  depend  to  a  large  extent  on  whether  your  personality  is  vigorous and  dynamic  or  calm  and  easygoing.  Regardless  of  your  personality,  gestures  will  add  to  the effectiveness   of   your   speech   if   you   relax   your   shoulders,   arms,   and   hands   and   concentrate   on communicating  to  the  audience  the  meaning  and  importance  of  your  ideas.  When  the  gesture is  natural,  it  is  effective.  If  the  gesture  is  artificial,  posed,  or  strained,  it  detracts  rather  than reinforces.   Practice   gestures   as   a   natural   part   of   your   speaking   manner;   they   should   arise spontaneously   from   enthusiasm   and   conviction. Descriptive  gestures  portray  an  object  or  illustrate  an  action.  Describe  the  size,  shape,  or movement  of  an  object  by  imitation.  Show  a  vigorous  punch  by  striking  with  your  fist;  show height   by   holding   your   hand   at   the   desired   level;   show   speed   by   a   quick   sweep   of   your   arm. Pantomime  a  complicated  or  humorous  movement  as  you  describe  it.  Use  your  hands  to  sign a  message,  such  as  a   “V”  formed   with   two   fingers   as   a   symbol   of   victory. 40

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