Quantcast Figure  5-3.-Five  step  questioning  technique.

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Techniques of Oral Questioning - 14300_60
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Other   Questioning   Techniques
T h e   f i r s t s t e p   i  n g o o d questioning   techniques   is   to   state the  question. Since  the  intent  of questioning   is   to   provoke   thought, ask  the  question  before  calling  on  a person   to   answer.   That   encourages e a c h    m e m b e r    o f    t h e    c l a s s    to formulate   an   answer. Many instructors   make   the   mistake   of calling  on  a  student  before  stating the   question. That  allows  the  rest of   the   students   to   relax   and   not formulate   an   answer.   When   you state   the   question   first   and   then pause   for   a   few   seconds,   everyone will  begin  actively  thinking  of  an answer. This   thinking   process enables   students   who   you   do   not select  to  answer  the  question  time  to think  so  that  they  may  add  to  the response. I d e n t i f y i n g     t he r e s p o n d e n t    b e f o r e    a s k i n g    t he Figure  5-3.-Five  step  questioning  technique. question  may  startle  and  fluster  some  students  so  much  that  they  may  not  be  able  to  respond, even  if  they  know  the  answer.  State  the  question  clearly,  giving  one  central  thought,  by  placing the   interrogative   word   at   the   beginning   of   the   statement   to   alert   students   that   a   question   is coming.  Do  not  repeat  the  question  or  change  the  wording  of  the  question  unless  necessary. After   asking   a   question,   pause  to   allow   the   students   time   to   think   through   their   answers. Vary  the  duration  of  the  pause  depending  on  the  difficulty  of  the  question  and  the  level  of  the students.  Most  instructors  fail  to  pause  long  enough  after  asking  their  questions.  Calling  on a   student   too   quickly   is   as   detrimental   as   calling   on   the   student   before   asking   the   question. After  pausing  for  a  reasonable  time,  call  on  a  student  by  name  to  answer  the  question.  That satisfies  a  basic  student  need  for  recognition. If  students  feel  you  recognize  their  individual efforts,  they  will  put  forth  greater  effort.  When  selecting  a  person  to  respond,  consider  both  the difficulty   of   the   question   and   the   individual   abilities   of   students.   Consistently   assigning   a difficulty  question  to  a  slower  learner  will  remotivate  that  student.  Spread  the  questions  around without  establishing  a  predictable  pattern.  A  predictable  pattern  includes  calling  on  students either  in  alphabetical  or  seating  order  or  calling  upon  a  select  few  whose  names  you  know. Scattering  questions  also  prevents  mental  loafing.  Faster  learners  will  dominate  the  class  if  you do   not   control   student   participation. Achieve  a  balance  between  calling  on  volunteer respondents  and  nonvolunteers.  Allow  only  one  student  to  answer  at  a  time,  but  encourage  all students   to   participate   and   volunteer   answers.   Although   you   may   not   call   upon   every   student, let  students  know  you The  next  step  is  to expect  them  to  take  an  active  part. comment  on  the  given  answer  or  acknowledge  the  response.  That 49

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