Click Here to
Order this information in Print

Click Here to
Order this information on CD-ROM

Click Here to
Download this information in PDF Format

 

Click here to make tpub.com your Home Page

Page Title: Lee Helm
Back | Up | Next

Click here for a printable version

Google


Web
www.tpub.com

Home

   
Information Categories
.... Administration
Advancement
Aerographer
Automotive
Aviation
Combat
Construction
Diving
Draftsman
Engineering
Electronics
Food and Cooking
Math
Medical
Music
Nuclear Fundamentals
Photography
Religion
USMC
   
Products
  Educational CD-ROM's
Printed Manuals
Downloadable Books

   


 

Share on Google+Share on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on TwitterShare on DiggShare on Stumble Upon
Back
Bridge Equipment - 12966_316
Up
Naval Orientation - Military manual for administrative purposes
Next
Compasses
to an electrical signal. This electrical signal is then transmitted to the steering engine, usually located near  the  stern  of  the  ship.  Here  the  electrical signal is received by the steering engine, where it is  converted  to  a  mechanical  input  to  move  the rudder.  The  movement  of  the  rudder  causes  the ship to move in the desired direction. The ship is normally steered from the helm on the bridge. If that part of the ship should sustain any kind of damage, the steering can be shifted to other locations, such as after steering. LEE HELM The lee helm of a ship could be compared to the gas pedal of a car. The lee helm, which can be seen in   figure   18-5,   is   actually   two   instruments   in one—the  engine-order  telegraph  and  the  engine- revolution indicator. Engine-Order Telegraph The    engine-order    telegraph    communicates speed orders to the engine room. It  has  duplicate dials divided into sectors for flank, full, standard, 2/3,  and  1/3  speed  ahead  and  1/3,  2/3,  and  full speed back. A hand lever fitted with  an  indicator travels over the circumference of the circular face of  the  instrument.  When  the  handle  is  moved  to the  required  speed  sector,  the  engine  room  com- plies with the order immediately. The engine room notifies the bridge that it has complied with the 134.54 Figure 18-5.-An interior view of the bridge of USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69). The box-like console in the left   foreground of the figure is the lee helm; it includes the engine-order telegraph, which is the cylinder-shaped   component, fitted with a hand lever, showing a circular-faced dial divided into sectors. 18-5

Privacy Statement - Press Release - Copyright Information. - Contact Us - Support Integrated Publishing

comments powered by Disqus

Integrated Publishing, Inc.
9438 US Hwy 19N #311 Port Richey, FL 34668

Phone For Parts Inquiries: (727) 755-3260
Google +