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Naval Orientation - Military manual for administrative purposes
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CHAPTER 20 NAVAL WEAPONS SYSTEMS 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. LEARNING  OBJECTIVES Upon  completion  of  this  chapter,  you  should  be  able  to  do  the  following: Identify  the  gunnery  systems  used  on  Navy 6.  Identify  the  air-to-air  missiles  used  by  the ships. Navy. Describe   the   purpose   of   gun   fire   control equipment. 7. Identify the air-to-ground missiles used by the Navy. Identify  the  antiair  warfare  (AAW)  missiles used  by  the  Navy. 8. Identify various airborne weapons used by the Identify the cruise missiles used by the Navy. Navy. Identify   the   antisubmarine   warfare   (ASW) 9.  Identify  the  Navy’s  nuclear  weapons  capa- weapons  used  by  the  Navy. bility. Before   the   discovery   of   gunpowder,   naval battles  were  fought  with  row-galley  tactics.  In general,  two  methods  were  employed.  A  galley could maneuver near the enemy vessel and attempt to ram it, overturn it, board it by grappling hooks, or shave off its oars by a close run. An alternative procedure was to catapult flaming sulphur, pitch, niter, or oil onto the enemy ship; row away; and watch  the  fire.  Although  crossbows  and  shipborne spring-   or   torsion-powered   artillery   did   allow some   battle   action   before   actual   ship-to-ship contact,  the  ram  was  the  main  weapon.  Speed  and maneuverability  were  the  best  defenses. Today,   however, weapons   systems   are extremely  complex.  They  include  both  the  weapon and  the  fire  control  equipment  used  with  the weapon. Fire  control  entails  problem  solving:  the problem  of  destroying  a  target  with  the  armament of your ship or aircraft. Solutions must be found for the three types of targets: surface, subsurface, and air targets. The effective use of any weapons system requires the delivery of a destructive device to a target. The destructive device (weapon) could be   a   guided   missile,   gun   projectile,   rocket, torpedo,  or  depth  charge. To  deliver  the  weapon  accurately,  we  must know  the  location,  direction  of  travel,  and  the velocity of the target. Since many air targets now travel  faster  than  sound,  they  must  be  engaged at  great  distances.  A  weapon  is  most  effective when used as part of a ship’s or aircraft’s weapons system against such targets. A  weapons  system  includes  the  following: 1. 2. 3. 4. Units that detect, locate, and identify the target Units that direct or aim a delivery unit (for example, gun or guided-missile fire control radar) Units  that  deliver  or  initiate  the  delivery  of the  weapon  to  the  target  (for  example, missile  battery,  gun  battery) Units  termed  weapons   that  destroy  the target  when  in  contact  with  it  or  near  it While  this  serves  as  a  brief  overview  of a  weapons  system,  let’s  look  a  little  deeper 20-1

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