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During Military Funerals
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Naval Orientation - Military manual for administrative purposes
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He Knows the Ropes
at    sea    are    regarded    primarily    as    military ceremonies. Service personnel wearing civilian clothing at a military funeral follow the etiquette prescribed for civilians. Honors to the Colors Naval  ships  not  underway  hoist  the  national ensign at the flagstaff aft at 0800 and lower it at sunset.  Likewise,  they  hoist  and  lower  the  union jack at the jackstaff forward at the same time. At colors,  they  smartly  hoist  the  ensign,  lower  it slowly,  and  never  allow  it  to  touch  the  deck.  At both  morning  and   evening   colors,   ships   sound “Attention,” and all officers and enlisted personnel topside face the  ensign  and  render  the  salute.  At shore  stations  and,  in  peacetime,  on  board  large vessels  where  a  band  is  present,  they  play  the national  anthem  during  the  ceremonies.  In  the absence  of  a  band,  a  bugler,  if  available,  sounds “To   the   Colors”   at   morning   ceremonies   and “Retreat”  at  sunset  formalities.  (When  underway, naval  ships  usually  fly  the  ensign  both  day  and night from the mast and do not hoist the jack.) In half-roasting the ensign, personnel first raise it to the truck or peak and then  lower  it  to  half-mast. Before  lowering  the  ensign  from  half-mast,  they first raise it to the truck or peak and then lower it. During colors, boats underway  within  sight  or hearing of the ceremony either lie to or proceed at the  slowest  safe  speed.  Boat  officers–or  in  their absence, coxswains–stand and salute except when dangerous  to  do  so.  Other  persons  in  the  boat remain   seated   or   standing   and   do   not   salute. Vehicles  within  sight  or  hearing  of  colors  stop. Persons  riding  in  vehicles  sit  at  attention.  The person   in   charge   of   a   military   vehicle   (but someone other than the  driver)  renders  the  hand salute. When   a   vessel   under   the   flag   of   a   nation formally   recognized   by   the   government   of   the United   States   salutes   a   ship   of  our    Navy   by dipping its ensign, our ship returns the salute dip for   dip.   U.S.   naval   vessels   never   initiate   the dipping of the ensign. In  the  large  assortment  of  flags  carried   by American  men-of-war,  only  one  flies  above  the ensign–the    church    pennant    (fig.    7-6).    It    is displayed   during   a   divine   service   held   by   a chaplain or visiting church dignitary. 134.38 Figure 7-6.-The church pennant, displayed during divine services, is the only emblem that may be flown above the ensign. SUMMARY Courtesy  can  be  defined  as  an  act  or  verbal expression  of  consideration  or  respect  for  others. When a person acts with courtesy toward another, the   courtesy   is   likely   to   be   returned.   We   are courteous to our seniors because we are  aware  of their  greater  responsibilities  and  authority.  We are courteous to our juniors because we are aware of   their   important   contributions   to   the   Navy’s mission. In the military service, and particularly in the Navy  where  personnel  must  live   and   work   in rather close quarters, we must practice courtesy in all that we do on and off duty. Military courtesy is important  to  everyone  in  the  Navy.  If  you  know and   practice   military   courtesy,   you   will   make favorable impressions and display a self-assurance 7-18

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